Steven Raichlen's Barbecue! Bible

Where Did Kamado Grills Come From?

Where Did Kamado Grills Come From?

Illustration on the left by Trudy Michels, Studio Michels. I met Jeroen Hazebroek ten years ago at a trade fair in Cologne. He impressed me by both his knowledge of kamado cookers and the lusciousness of the food he cooked on them. He’s just written a terrific new book on kamados, Hot Coals, available in his native Dutch and English. I asked Jeroen to share a blog post with us on the history of this singular and eminently versatile cooker. –Steven The use of ceramic grills or kamados is exploding...

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Biggest Baddest Beef Recipes: Beef Shoulder Clod

Biggest Baddest Beef Recipes: Beef Shoulder Clod

Barbecuers seem to give pork shoulder (a.k.a. Boston butt) all the love, ignoring its beef counterpart, shoulder clod. That’s a shame, because it’s easy to cook, drop-dead gorgeous to serve, and if you love beef, a slice of this tender, crusty, smoky meat will make you feel like you’ve died and gone to heaven. Get the recipe for Texas Clod (Barbecued Beef Shoulder). Haven’t heard of it? Clod is one of the sacred meats...

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What Is It? The Rib Rack

What Is It? The Rib Rack

It’s a challenge that frustrates rib fanatics everywhere. Vertical grills and smokers, like the kettle grill, Weber Smokey Mountain, and Big Green Egg, turn out excellent moist smoky ribs. But a 22-inch diameter grill grate accommodates two, maybe three racks of baby backs. (Even fewer if you’re smoking spareribs or beef long ribs.) And two racks of ribs do not a party make. There’s a simple solution: cook the ribs upright in a rib...

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Gazpacho Hits the Grill

Gazpacho Hits the Grill

Photo by Richard Dallett. Triple digit heat across the Midwest and Europe. Drought in California. Wildfires throughout the West. 2015 is shaping up to be one of the most torrid summers on record, and that’s before you factor in the heat of the grill. For years, I’ve relied on a simple remedy from the garden to beat the heat—a sort of a cross between a cold soup and salad. The Spanish call it gazpacho. I call it the most refreshing...

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Organic Spices to Flavor Your Meats

Organic Spices to Flavor Your Meats

This blog post is brought to you with support from our sponsor, Spicely.com, who provided the samples and advertising support. "Where your meat comes from and how it’s raised matters as much as how you smoke it.” This is the mantra of my new Project Smoke show on Public Television, where we try to use only grass-fed beef, heritage pork, and organic chicken and vegetables. And so it goes with the spices you use to flavor your meats. In a world of spices...

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Beef Brisket Made Easy

Beef Brisket Made Easy

Photo by Richard Dallett. Brisket. Few words have such power to make mouths water and stomachs roar with hunger. Brisket is the summum of Texas barbecue and its popularity extends far beyond the Lone Star State. Food writers and pit masters like to mystify the process, making smoking a brisket sound as difficult as quantum physics. Well, I’m going to let you in on a little secret: Brisket is easy, requiring maybe 30 minutes of actual work from start to finish. True, that start to finish can stretch as long as 16 hours. But armed with the right tools (a sharp knife, a remote digital thermometer, and unlined butcher...

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National S’mores Day Is Coming Up: Here Are 10 New Ways to Celebrate

National S’mores Day Is Coming Up: Here Are 10 New Ways to Celebrate

You heard it here first: Monday, August 10, is National S’mores Day. The origins of this campfire treat are unclear. We do know that the recipe for s’mores first appeared in a 1927 scouting handbook called Tramping and Trailing with the Girl Scouts. Yes, this portmanteau word—a combination of “some” and “more”—has been on the lips of North American outdoor cooks for nearly a century. (As have dabs of gooey fire-roasted marshmallows, smears of chocolate, and graham...

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Your Guide to Heritage Meats

Your Guide to Heritage Meats

Left two photos by Edsel Little via Creative Commons. Right photo by Jim Richardson. If you’re a fan of the TV show Portlandia, you’ll remember the first episode where Peter and Nance pepper a restaurant server with questions about the chicken they are about to order. The waitress obliges them with the chicken’s photo and curriculum vitae—the fowl’s name is “Colin”—and he was raised, we learn, on a farm just south of Portland. Peter and Nance put a hold on the table and excuse themselves to check...

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