Steven Raichlen's Barbecue! Bible

(Salmon) Candy is Dandy

(Salmon) Candy is Dandy

You’ve eaten salmon grilled, roasted, blackened, planked, and pan-fried; perhaps you’ve even chopped it to make burgers. (We’ll be talking about all these preparation methods—except pan-frying—in future blogs.) But have you made salmon candy, also known as Indian candy? (We no longer call it “squaw candy” by reason of political correctness.) British Columbians snack on it and it’s a staple in Pacific Northwest gift shops. Think of it as jerky,...

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Chicken Trumps Beef

Chicken Trumps Beef

Photo by BBQ Board member Dyal_SC Brace yourself for some shocking news. For the first time in a century—maybe in our nation’s history—Americans eat more chicken than beef. According to the USDA and reported by National Public Radio, in 2012 (the most recent year for which we have data), we consumed a per capita 57.5 pounds of beef. For you history buffs out there, that’s about the same consumption level we had in 1909. Beef-eating peaked in America in the 1970s, when we managed...

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Introducing Ziplist

Introducing Ziplist

Once in awhile (actually a lot more than once in a while), I get emails asking for help finding one of my recipes. Some of you rely on these recipes so much that your book pages are stained beyond recognition or completely falling out altogether (thank you for that). For once, technology is about to make your life simpler. The solution? Ziplist. Now you’ll be able to save all your favorite recipes from BarbecueBible.com (and any other site) in one convenient...

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Belly Up to Steak

Belly Up to Steak

Photo by BBQ Board member Dyal_SC The Spanish name says it all. Fajita, literally “girdle.” This robust steak from the underbelly of the steer (we call it skirt steak) has everything a carnivore hungers for: a bold flavor and no-nonsense texture you can sink your teeth into at a price you can afford. Anyone can look like a genius cooking a tender filet mignon. It takes skill—even cojones—to turn out a good skirt steak. The skirt belongs to a family of cheap, fibrous, big-flavored steaks...

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Valentine’s Day with Heart

Valentine’s Day with Heart

Today is Valentine’s Day. I’m giving my wife a heart-shaped card (or at least a card decorated with hearts). If I’m smart, I’ll throw in a heart-shaped box of chocolates. The one thing I won’t do is serve her a dish that’s a barbecue icon in Peru and Bolivia, and that’s turning up grilled, or otherwise, served at an increasing number of cutting-edge restaurants in North America. I’m referring to beef, veal, lamb, and chicken hearts. Exhibit #1. The grilled lamb heart salad served at Portland, Oregon’s new temple...

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Chocolate Meets Grill

Chocolate Meets Grill

If the way to someone’s proverbial heart is through the stomach, an even faster route is with chocolate. As a spouse, partner, or parent, you probably know this already. If not, learn it fast. When I was growing up, chocolate was, well chocolate. Today, you have to choose between dark chocolate and milk, bar chocolate and cocoa, single estate chocolate and 90 percent. And what the heck are cocoa nibs? All chocolate derives from the seedpod of a tropical fruit appropriately named Theobroma...

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Grilling in the Chinese New Year

Grilling in the Chinese New Year

Two men celebrating with bak kua (grilled pork jerky) While many of us were preparing for Super Bowl parties last weekend, the Chinese welcomed a bronco of a different sort: the Year of the Horse. Fortunately, it’s not too late to celebrate the Chinese New Year: Festivities last for 15 days, making this the longest holiday on the Chinese calendar. Perfect for guys like me, who despite the best intentions, don’t always post holiday cards on time. My first impulse is to celebrate...

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Embrace the Cold-Weather Griller in You

Embrace the Cold-Weather Griller in You

Quick, when it snows, what do you shovel first: the path to your car or the path to your grill? Believe it or not, when I was growing up, people routinely retired their grills after Labor Day. Times have changed. Whether it’s due to a protracted appetite for the smoky flavors of summer or the continued need for barbecue bragging rights all year long, live-fire cooking outdoors has become a four-season obsession. You might wonder why you’d take winter...

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