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4.5lb Brisket Question

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Post Fri May 28, 2010 2:00 pm
papabbq rare
rare

Posts: 22
Location: Wheaton, Illinois
jfm0830 wrote:
Boy you are right, that cook just doesn't seem meant to be. Bad karma all around.

I always do the flat and there is never a problem getting a good temperature reading assuming the probe is in the middle of the meat. Now I have had a problem where my temperature probe(s) have read 2X high. Perhaps that is what is happening here, because typically my briskets are in the mid 40's when they go on the smoker. Your readings are 95, half of which is 47.

What has caused this for me is getting a little water at the end of the metal probe where it turns from solid metal to braided wire. I was giving the probe end a final cleaning and some water made it's way down. I now hold my probes with paper towel just above this point to try to stop the water migration while cleaning. If you had just cleaned the probes shortly before putting the brisket on the smoker this could be the issue. Usually the temps will come back to normal in an hour or two of getting on the smoker.

It is also possible the probe is too close to the surface. I try to insert the probe from the side and not the top on a brisket. I go in from the the side so the probe is running parallel to the grill grate. If the meat is real thin I will kneel down so my eyes are right at counter height and I can sight along the length of the probe and see it is going in parallel to the counter top. In a situation like this you could try inserting the probe again to see if that helps-if you value your fingerprints use BBQ gloves.

Image

Note the probe in the brisket is going in from the side, not at an angle from the top. It is more secure that way. Also note the probe is going in from the thickest end and is pointing in towards the thickest part of the meat.


I have a two probe Maverick ET-7 which is meant for the grill, but I often use this thermo on my smoker even with a single piece of meat. I use the grate probe of my Maverick ET-73 to measure just the grate temp. This way I can get two meat temp readings and if one is wacky I can simply ignore it. Since I have been holding the probe with the paper towel, I haven't had the 2X high readings. So if you happen to have another thermo or a two probe thermo, no reason not to use the second probe even on a single piece of meat.

Lastly you could try taking the temp of the meat with the instant read like you say. I am guessing it will still be in the 160's at that time. If it comes off in the early afternoon you can foil it and put it in a cooler wrapped in a towel or newspapers and it will hold for 3 or 4 hours till you get home. Good luck. I will keep my fingers crossed you will be feasting on a good brisket.

Jim


Hey guys, am I missing something here or isn't there supposed to be some fat on the brisket? He said it was a bit dry. wouldn't that explain it?

John
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Post Fri May 28, 2010 2:25 pm
jayeffel well done
well done

Posts: 345
Location: Chambersburg, Pennsylvania
Just did my first brisket today also- 98.6 lb. on a CG duo w/SFB.

In very short time my meat temp went from 44 to 135. I saw no plateau at all. meat hit 193 at about 4/1/2 hours.

My Maverick 73 thermometer may be reading wrong; read about 15-20 degrees higher than another probe thermo-except when it showed 195, the other showed 193.

I started this brisket this morning due to info from other grillers- didn't want to run short of time. IF i had waited until tomorrow (when we eat it) it would of course been one to take much longer!!
Chargriller King Griller (Kamado)
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Post Fri May 28, 2010 2:46 pm
jfm0830 well done
well done

Posts: 2638
papabbq wrote:
Hey guys, am I missing something here or isn't there supposed to be some fat on the brisket? He said it was a bit dry. wouldn't that explain it?

John


If you are referring to the brisket in the photos above from the post that you quoted, it actually did have a fat cap of between 1/8" to 1/4" covering about 3/4 of the top surface. It is a bit hard to see because the brisket had been mopped just then & several times prior with a mop sauce that was reddish in color due to the presence of some red hued spices like paprika, cayenne and chili powder.

Brisket is a bit of a voodoo science I think., But in my experience it is the most finicky of the holy trinity (brisket, pulled pork & ribs) in terms of cooking temperature. The closer you keep it to 225 or whatever your recipe calls for the better. Even with a fat cap, if the temps go too high a brisket will dry out.

Jim

Post Fri May 28, 2010 2:51 pm
papabbq rare
rare

Posts: 22
Location: Wheaton, Illinois
Thanks Jim. I'm sorta new at brisket and thought there should be some fat. I didn't know it melted off that much.
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Post Fri May 28, 2010 3:10 pm
jfm0830 well done
well done

Posts: 2638
No problem, we are all here to learn something and share what we've learned.

Actually the fat cap hadn't burned off, so much as become masked by the mop which had "died" it if you will, with its red color. If you look really carefully you can see a bit of white from the fat cap here & there. While many mops I've used are amber color, this one was deep red and had simply "painted" the fat.

While many people say brisket is the hardest of the holy trinity to make, I happened to have good luck with them right from the start. I'm sure initially it was beginners luck. One thing I did always try to do was keep the temps from going too high. While I lucked out early with brisket, it took me 5 years before I was truly happy with my ribs. Not that I still can't improve too.

Just keep trying more briskets and learn to control your temps on your smoker and you will turn out some mean briskets. I try to hold plus or minus 10 degrees for most items, but brisket I try to hold a 5 degree tolerance. Doable in the summer, a lofty goal in the winter.

Jim

Post Wed Apr 19, 2017 7:49 pm
KobyKoby rare
rare

Posts: 11
i think ribs are just so much easier to cook than brisket lol......
thanks for the good tips! i hope i can make some good briskets in the future

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