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How green is too green to use

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Post Fri May 24, 2013 3:38 pm
SlowSmoken rare
rare

Posts: 10
Please pardon the nob question but still learning. My neighbor is a landscaper and had to cut down to plumb trees that were healthy and alive, just in the way. Good for me he thought of me and brought me all the wood.

I am in the process of cutting it up into useable chucks. I was wanting to use some this weekend in a gas smoker but this wood is just so wet. Does this mean it will smoke better or do I need to let it dry out over the summer before using.

Any thought or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Slow

Post Fri May 24, 2013 3:50 pm
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7110
Location: Stoughton, WI
How big are the pieces anbd how long ago were they cut? If they're small logs or hefty branches you'll want to let them season for a few months but small branches and twigs can be OK after a few weeks.

Post Fri May 24, 2013 6:56 pm
SlowSmoken rare
rare

Posts: 10
The tree's where cut yesterday and they are 4" in diameter to about 2" in diameter. I have peeled all the bark off today (what a PITA that was) and cut everything into about 9" in length. I an now splitting it into strips.

Post Fri May 24, 2013 8:26 pm
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7110
Location: Stoughton, WI
Good luck! Do you have any way to speed up the drying process? I hesitate to suggest an oven because of anything the plum wood might give off as it dries.

Post Fri May 24, 2013 9:06 pm
SlowSmoken rare
rare

Posts: 10
I guess I will be letting it dry over the summer before using. Just went out to check it and now that it is all peeled water is just oozing out.

At least I am building up my winter supply.

Thanks

Post Fri May 24, 2013 9:50 pm

Posts: 22
Location: Old Town, Maine
I have used freshly cut apple wood as a smoke source on a few occasions, mostly while grilling but also on a pork butt and a chuckie and I must say the smoke was very good quality and I will do it again. I used pieces about 3" long by 1" thick.
I cook with charcoal and plum wood may act differently than apple, so YMMV if you use it green.
I don't think you need to peel off the bark.

Post Fri May 24, 2013 9:54 pm
lostarrow well done
well done

Posts: 581
Location: mississippi
SlowSmoken wrote:
I guess I will be letting it dry over the summer before using. Just went out to check it and now that it is all peeled water is just oozing out.

At least I am building up my winter supply.

Thanks

You don't need to peel the bark.
Usually wood needs to season 1/2 year.
You can heat in your gas smoker on low for several years to speed up the process.
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Post Sat May 25, 2013 7:35 am
SlowSmoken rare
rare

Posts: 10
I spent half a day peeling all the bark :( . At least I learned another lesson.

Post Sat May 25, 2013 2:30 pm
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5691
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
Here is a sure-fire way to tell if wood is seasoned enough: knock a few pieces together.

If you get more of a "thunk" sound, it still needs more seasoning. If it has more of a "ring" to it, then it's done.

I got a feel for this sound by knocking a few scraps of 2x4 together. They make the "ringing" sound.
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.


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