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Hot dogs coast to coast

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Post Wed Jul 10, 2013 2:13 am
beercuer User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 2287
Location: Southern Californy
Cactus1 wrote:
beercuer - That is one hellacious hot dog! I've wrapped dogs and other sausages in tortillas before but nothing that elaborate.

Most kind, Cactus, thank you. :D I also like the way tortillas make for a neat and tidy package. And then there are the other variations... roll 'em like taquitos in corn tortillas for a kind of corn dog of sorts (suitable for dipping), and even dogging in hard taco shells. Also, Romaine lettuce leaves and cabbage can make for some nifty containers as well. :cheers:
Got beer???

Post Wed Jul 10, 2013 5:02 pm
Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 754
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
beercuer wrote:
Cactus1 wrote:
beercuer - That is one hellacious hot dog! I've wrapped dogs and other sausages in tortillas before but nothing that elaborate.

Most kind, Cactus, thank you. :D I also like the way tortillas make for a neat and tidy package. And then there are the other variations... roll 'em like taquitos in corn tortillas for a kind of corn dog of sorts (suitable for dipping), and even dogging in hard taco shells. Also, Romaine lettuce leaves and cabbage can make for some nifty containers as well. :cheers:

Not often but I've done the lettuce and cabbage leaves - should do them more. We'll buy tortillas for tacos, burritos, or quesadillas about once a month. I pack is not enough and two is to many. I'm not a wasteful kind of guy so I want to use them up. I even like them spread with peanut butter and jelly and popped under the broiler for a few seconds.
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18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
22 1/2" OTS
26 3/4" OTG

Post Thu Jul 11, 2013 2:20 am
beercuer User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 2287
Location: Southern Californy
Cactus1 wrote:
Not often but I've done the lettuce and cabbage leaves - should do them more. We'll buy tortillas for tacos, burritos, or quesadillas about once a month. I pack is not enough and two is to many. I'm not a wasteful kind of guy so I want to use them up. I even like them spread with peanut butter and jelly and popped under the broiler for a few seconds.


That's a creative idea with the peanut butter... I like it! I'm really fond of peanut butter on whole wheat toast, so I'm going to have to try your idea.
Got beer???

Post Thu Jul 11, 2013 11:42 am
Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 754
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
beercuer wrote:
Cactus1 wrote:
Not often but I've done the lettuce and cabbage leaves - should do them more. We'll buy tortillas for tacos, burritos, or quesadillas about once a month. I pack is not enough and two is to many. I'm not a wasteful kind of guy so I want to use them up. I even like them spread with peanut butter and jelly and popped under the broiler for a few seconds.


That's a creative idea with the peanut butter... I like it! I'm really fond of peanut butter on whole wheat toast, so I'm going to have to try your idea.

Good stuff! I'm a big bologna guy - just plain old bologna on a tortilla, add some cheese, and jalapeno pepper slices, pop under broiler for a couple minutes, top with my favorite, imported from Cleveland, Stadium Mustard, roll or fold over - finest sandwich you'd ever want to eat!
Don't keep bread in the house on a regular basis. Just me and the wife, unless the kids come over or we have other company, and it goes to waste. I don't like store or national brand breads. Worked in a commercial bakery years ago and I know the source. My only exception to this is hot dog or hamburger rolls. I usually buy cheapest store brand. Know they are the same as the national brands at 1/2 the price. They come off of the same line and bun wrappers just change the packaging. I try to buy from local bakers when I buy bread or rolls, but the cheap white just for quickie hot dogs, burgers, or sloppy joes, tastes good!
* IHP Cactus Farm & Sauce Shack *
18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
22 1/2" OTS
26 3/4" OTG

Post Mon Jul 15, 2013 10:56 am
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7526
Location: Stoughton, WI
Awhile back I decided to combine a New York dog with a Chicago bun, and wound up with this:

Image Image Image

It was kind of a twist on a Chicago-style hot dog, although Mrs. Chicken put just tomatoes on hers. No, that's not ketchup...it's Secret Stadium Sauce. Although it's probably still somewhat in violation of the "no ketchup" rule. :wink:

Post Mon Jul 15, 2013 12:32 pm
rhino260 medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 94
Location: Waynesboro,Pa
Schwan's makes an awesome natural casing hot dog.
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Post Mon Jul 15, 2013 4:50 pm
Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 754
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
ScreamingChicken wrote:
Awhile back I decided to combine a New York dog with a Chicago bun, and wound up with this:

Image Image Image

It was kind of a twist on a Chicago-style hot dog, although Mrs. Chicken put just tomatoes on hers. No, that's not ketchup...it's Secret Stadium Sauce. Although it's probably still somewhat in violation of the "no ketchup" rule. :wink:

Secret Stadium Sauce ... Is that anywhere as good as my favorite, imported from Cleveland, Stadium Mustard?
* IHP Cactus Farm & Sauce Shack *
18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
22 1/2" OTS
26 3/4" OTG

Post Tue Jul 16, 2013 12:23 am
Joe Grod medium
medium

Posts: 190
Location: Morganville, NJ
I love hot dogs, always have, always will and living in the New York, New Jersey area I have probably tried every type, but I especially love the non commercial dogs produced by local ethnic establishments. That said, whats the story with "Emerald Relish". I see it on T.V. as part of a "Chicago Hot Dog", but can't find it here in N.J.. B&G used to make it, but seem to have dropped it. Any thoughts?

Joe
Image

Post Tue Jul 16, 2013 9:16 am
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7526
Location: Stoughton, WI
Cactus1 wrote:
Secret Stadium Sauce ... Is that anywhere as good as my favorite, imported from Cleveland, Stadium Mustard?
Well, that's like comparing apples to oranges...but I will say that it's way better than ketchup! :lol:

Joe Grod wrote:
That said, whats the story with "Emerald Relish". I see it on T.V. as part of a "Chicago Hot Dog", but can't find it here in N.J.. B&G used to make it, but seem to have dropped it. Any thoughts?
You could always contact Vienna Beef to see if any retailers in your area carry its version of the relish:

http://www.viennabeef.com/hot-dog-condiments

Post Tue Jul 16, 2013 10:25 am
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5877
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
ScreamingChicken wrote:
It was kind of a twist on a Chicago-style hot dog, although Mrs. Chicken put just tomatoes on hers. No, that's not ketchup...it's Secret Stadium Sauce. Although it's probably still somewhat in violation of the "no ketchup" rule. :wink:


So what is Secret Stadium Sauce like? Spicy, sweet, salty, fiery? I like to fiddle around with sauces like that.

Joe Grod wrote:
I love hot dogs, always have, always will and living in the New York, New Jersey area I have probably tried every type, but I especially love the non commercial dogs produced by local ethnic establishments. That said, whats the story with "Emerald Relish". I see it on T.V. as part of a "Chicago Hot Dog", but can't find it here in N.J.. B&G used to make it, but seem to have dropped it. Any thoughts?

Joe


Same question here. Is it like a sweet pickle relish, or a dill pickle relish, or what? I hit the relish shelf on a regular basis along with the mustard, and at one point I had about 8 jars of the stuff in the fridge. That's in addition to the few kinds I make myself, so that's why I'm asking - it would be fun to try to duplicate the stuff.
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Post Tue Jul 16, 2013 11:44 am
Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 754
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
The Chicago dog relish is just regular sweet pickle relish with additional food color added. No big deal!
I'm reading through Andy Husbands, Chris Hart, and Andrea Pyenson's "Wicked Good Barbecue ..." Forward is by some guy named Steve Raichen. They have won at "The Jack" and American Royal. They are way over the top! First of my extensive collection that I'm reading word for word cover to cover. They have a recipe - D.I.Y. Corndogs that has a recipe and method for making your own hot dog. I may just start at the beginning of the book and try to duplicate every recipe in it.
* IHP Cactus Farm & Sauce Shack *
18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
22 1/2" OTS
26 3/4" OTG

Post Tue Jul 16, 2013 8:07 pm
Seattle-Q well done
well done

Posts: 439
Location: Kirkland, WA
A huge hit here in Seattle are street cart hot dogs with cream cheese on them. Never tried them myself but everyone at 3AM say they are amazing.

Post Wed Jul 17, 2013 10:13 am
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5877
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
Seattle-Q wrote:
A huge hit here in Seattle are street cart hot dogs with cream cheese on them. Never tried them myself but everyone at 3AM say they are amazing.


Sounds like a double-strength artery-clogger to me, but at 3 AM a lot of folks (including myself) will eat almost anything. :twisted:

Is there anything other than cream cheese on these dogs? Cream cheese by itself seems a bit bland - something else like hot salsa would make a combination.
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Post Wed Jul 17, 2013 9:04 pm
Seattle-Q well done
well done

Posts: 439
Location: Kirkland, WA
Yes, there are options and I will be lazy and copy and paste from Wikipedia than type it out.


From Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle-style_hot_dog

Seattle-style hot dog


A Seattle-style hot dog, sometimes referred to as a Seattle Dog, is a hot dog topped with cream cheese that has become popular in Seattle.
History

Although the origins are not clear, it has been adopted as a regional variation.[1] It is believed that the concept began in the Pioneer Square neighborhood in the late 1980s or early 1990s. One possible inventor is Hadley Longe who operated a bagel cart at night. He incorporated hot dogs on bialy sticks with cream cheese.[2]

Seattle Dogs increased in popularity at bars and music venues during the grunge movement of the 1990s. They are now often sold at bars and their surrounding street vendors at night.[3] They are also available at and near the city's sporting venues.[4][5] A vendor told the The Seattle Weekly that he believed large crowds visiting stands outside of Safeco Field during the Seattle Mariners 2001 116–46 season was "the big boom"[2] for the recipe.
Preparation

The meat is typically grilled and the bun is usually toasted. Polish sausage split down the middle is common.[6][7]

The use of cream cheese defines the Seattle-style hot dog. While some might be initially skeptical of the cream cheese and meat combination, people comment on the balance between the competing texture and flavors.[8] Sellers sometimes have devices similar to caulking guns to quickly dispense the cream cheese. The owner of Dante's Inferno Dogs says that he was the first to introduce their use.[2]

Grilled onions are one of the most popular additions. Other toppings include jalapenos and other peppers, sauerkraut or grilled cabbage, and scallions. Condiments such as mustard (American yellow or spicy brown), barbecue sauce, and Sriracha sauce are favorites, while ketchup is used less often.[9][10][11]

Post Thu Jul 18, 2013 10:13 am
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5877
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
Now you're talking! A hot dog (or split Polish sausage) with cream cheese, grilled onions, sauerkraut and spicy brown mustard sounds like one really great dog - no ketchup on mine, either. :D

Actually, that's pretty close to one of my favorite hot dogs anyway - I'd just have to swap out the regular cheese for cream cheese and everything else would stay the same.
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

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