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Brining Science

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Post Sat May 03, 2014 12:08 pm
JuliaBBQB User avatar
medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 58
Hi everyone,

I wrote my first post for The Grill Lab! In it, I explore the science behind brining. Most often, people attribute the benefits of brining to osmosis, but that's actually not 100% of the story.

On May 13th, I'll be posting about umami, "the fifth taste," so please keep an eye out for that.

I've added all the ideas you guys gave me last time to my list. Are there any other topics you want to see in this column?

Post Sun May 04, 2014 8:52 am
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7500
Location: Stoughton, WI
Thanks, Julia! It's a very informative post and helped explain why dry-brining works, too.

Post Wed May 07, 2014 8:24 am
BubbaQue well done
well done

Posts: 652
Location: Panama City Beach, Fl.

Great info. I started brining the Thankgiving Turkey about 10 years ago and I am a believer. Not only does it keep the bird moist, it allows you to add flavoring.
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Post Wed May 07, 2014 7:51 pm
BaasPro medium
medium

Posts: 171
Location: Alvaton, KY

Thanks, Julia! I can tell we're gonna like this column... :thumbup:
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Post Mon May 12, 2014 9:10 am
rhino260 medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 94
Location: Waynesboro,Pa
I used this brine over the weekend for spatchcock chicken, and its the best brine I ever used. This is going to be my go to brine from here on out:

Top-Secret Blue Ribbon Brine
(From Wicked Good Barbecue)

3/4 gallon spring water
1 quart low-sodium chicken broth
3/4 cup kosher salt
1/2 cup soy sauce
1 cup packed light brown sugar
1/2 cup maple syrup
1/4 cup blackstrap molasses (we used regular molasses)
1 cup Italian salad dressing
1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce
1/4 cup Dijon mustard
1/4 cup cider vinegar
1 apple, cored and cut into quarters (do not peel)
1 orange, cut into quarters
1 lemon, cut into quarters
1 onion, peeled and cut into quarters
6 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed
2 heads roasted garlic, split in half, skin on
2 chipotle peppers (canned in adobo sauce)
3 bay leaves
8 whole black peppercorns
2 tablespoons dried thyme
2 tablespoons dried sage
4 pieces candied ginger
1 cinnamon stick
2 tablespoons chili powder

Special Equipment: 5-gallon food-grade bucket

Bring the water, broth, salt, soy sauce, brown sugar, maple syrup, molasses, salad dressing, Worcestershire sauce, mustard, vinegar, apple, orange, lemon, onion, garlic (fresh and roasted), and chipotles to a boil in a large stockpot over medium-high heat. Remove from heat and add the bay leaves, peppercorns, thyme, sage, ginger, cinnamon, and chili powder. Using a whisk, mix ingredients well. Cover and let sit for 30 minutes.

Pour into bucket and cool to room temperature. Refrigerate overnight.
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Post Thu Jun 05, 2014 11:45 pm
bbquy well done
well done

Posts: 405
Location: Ct
Looking for some advice,

I am pretty salt sensitive and so my question is: Can you use less salt and still have a successful brine??

Thanks
currently: Jenn-Air 48,000 btu gasser, CG-Outlaw w/sfb, (3)Weber 22" Performer Gold, Weber Q

Post Fri Jun 06, 2014 7:22 pm
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7500
Location: Stoughton, WI
I'm thinking that if soy or worcestershire sauce is part of your brine you could get an umami effect, which might bring up the flavor without adding too much salt.

Post Sat Jun 07, 2014 12:30 am
bbquy well done
well done

Posts: 405
Location: Ct
Great idea! I'll give it a shot.
Thanks!
currently: Jenn-Air 48,000 btu gasser, CG-Outlaw w/sfb, (3)Weber 22" Performer Gold, Weber Q


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