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How do you sauce up your wings?

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Post Sun Jun 01, 2014 3:33 pm
Seattle-Q well done
well done

Posts: 439
Location: Kirkland, WA
I always sauce mine up spicy but have a few friends who like garlic parmesan and or honey mustard. I am looking to try out a few different flavors or styles so my guests have a choice.

So anyone want to toss out a few sauces recipes or styles that you really enjoy?

My spicy is just Franks, butter and a dash of worcestershire so I am welcome to ideas on how to kick that up too!

Post Sun Jun 01, 2014 5:54 pm
timbarber84 medium-well
medium-well

Posts: 205
Location: flatwoods ky

MY GIRLFRIEND AND I ARE ALL I COOK FOR I LIKE MINE IN HOT SAUCE BUT THAT GARLIC PARM. RECIPE SOUNDED GOOD I WOULDENT MIND TRYING THAT ONE
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Post Sun Jun 01, 2014 6:02 pm
CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
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Posts: 5918
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
Generally I do a basic BBQ sauce or a buffalo wing style sauce, but I've fiddled with dozens more. I like a basic honey-garlic-ginger sauce if I'm going for sweet, or a sweet chili sauce for sweet and hot. Both go really well with smoke.

One thing I've tried with great results is to go sauce-free, and just use a bit of oil and a good rub. This is something I've played around with a lot - I just use whatever good rub I have handy and add a bit of mustard powder and/or pepper (optional). This turns the wings really crispy and it's another way to cook great wings. Often I'll serve dipping sauces on the side with these as well.
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Post Mon Jun 02, 2014 8:02 am
sroach well done
well done

Posts: 1184
Location: Warrington, PA
Char,

I'm with you, I like a dry rub on them and then you can hit them some hot sauce.
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Post Mon Jun 02, 2014 5:57 pm
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7601
Location: Stoughton, WI
Along with grilling them dry I like to brine them with beer or wine for extra flavor.

Post Tue Jun 03, 2014 12:08 pm
Trollby well done
well done

Posts: 1304
Location: MadCity, WI

I normally do 2 or 3 sauces when I do my wings since I like spicy, wife likes sweet and son likes spicy BBQ not spicy.

I like to use Sambal or a Asian Garlic/Chili sauce. Many are spicy but not overly hot. Also you can use sriracha. I like to use Saki and sometimes soy with then to thin it.

I found marinating wings over night in Chili-Sriracha sauce blend adds a nice heat that is not over powering if you don't add more after cooking.

Another good blend I did was Italian dressing marinade then Garlic Parmesan lightly after cooked

Post Sun Aug 10, 2014 2:08 pm
jeffinsgf rare
rare

Posts: 17
I'm late to the wing discussion, but I've never known wings to be out of season.

What I wanted to pass along is a technique, rather than a sauce. Alton Brown (sorry to bring up a competitor on Steven's site :D ) has a technique where he steams the wings first, then chills them, then grills them. The steaming cooks off a ton of chicken fat and does something to the skin, so that when you grill them the skin gets crispy, very much like a well cooked deep-fried wing.

As for sauce, I'm a traditionalist. I want them bright red and seriously hot. I make my own pepper sauce (in fact, I'm going to make a batch this afternoon) in the Frank's tradition. I mix that, butter and tons and tons of fresh garlic.

Post Sun Aug 10, 2014 11:06 pm
BchrisL User avatar
medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 79
Location: Northern Virginia
By weight:
Three parts oil/fat...olive peanut, canola, butter, schmaltz, lard, tallow, what ever you like....
One part acid...vinegar, lemons, limes, fruit juice.

The I sprinkle in some. Salt, cracked pepper, and cayenne pepper if I want the to be hot. Maybe some other herbs like thyme or oregano or rosemary. To many flavors become distracting however, and I like to keep the list small.

Reserve some iv the mixture for basting. I then place the chicken and the marinade in a zip lock bag and remove the air from the bag. Marinate up to overnight, refrigerated.

And don't forget smoke. Smoke is spice. When I'm cooking with gas or charcoal, I add some wood chips around the edge of the fire so that they will smoke slowly. If you are burning wood, this is not necessary as the wood is there already, but char coal usually does not have enough smoke to flavor the wings in the short time they are on the grate.
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Post Mon Aug 11, 2014 8:41 am
ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7601
Location: Stoughton, WI
jeffinsgf wrote:
Alton Brown (sorry to bring up a competitor on Steven's site :D ) has a technique where he steams the wings first, then chills them, then grills them. The steaming cooks off a ton of chicken fat and does something to the skin, so that when you grill them the skin gets crispy, very much like a well cooked deep-fried wing.
That's interesting except for the part about getting rid of the fat, which is just wrong. :wink:

I'm thinking the fat beneath the skin might have something to do with delaying the crispness, so removing it by any means would make a difference. Seem to make sense?

Post Mon Aug 11, 2014 10:25 am
jeffinsgf rare
rare

Posts: 17
ScreamingChicken wrote:
That's interesting except for the part about getting rid of the fat, which is just wrong. :wink:

I'm thinking the fat beneath the skin might have something to do with delaying the crispness, so removing it by any means would make a difference. Seem to make sense?



My theory is that if your fire is hot enough to render the fat, the outside burns before the inside cooks. Why it doesn't do that in a fryer probably has something to do with the contact nature of the heat source. Think about it...you fry at around 350. It's tough to get a crispy skin in a 350 grill environment.

Don't exactly know how it works, only that it does. I have all the gear to fry wings, but it is a hassle and a mess. The steamed/grilled wings are just as crispy as fried and pick up some smokiness at the same time. Only problem with Alton's recipe is that it doesn't have nearly enough hot sauce in it. :twisted:

Post Thu Aug 14, 2014 9:01 am
grillmarks rare
rare

Posts: 17
I have to agree wit the above message. I am old school, wings should have one flavor HOT. Don't get me wrong I enjoy some of the other "fancy" flavors. Though, when it comes to wings they should be crispy and spicy. There is nothing better than a good wing that is so hot it makes your nose run followed by a tall cold beer.

Post Mon Aug 18, 2014 1:44 pm
tex_toby well done
well done

Posts: 1795
Location: Van Alstyne, Texas

I like mine spicy so you better cook your own if you want something different! :twisted: :lol:
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Post Wed Aug 20, 2014 12:57 pm
Fired medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 50
Location: Long Island
I tried something new, Tropical Pepper's Coconut Mango Pepper Sauce with some added Habernero sauce for kick. Basting the wings at the end with the sauce really knocks down the heat. I would up the Habernero sauce next time.

Post Sun Aug 24, 2014 10:02 pm
azza2594 rare
rare

Posts: 24
I make up a spice mix (essentially my dry rub) of hot cayenne, garlic powder, salt, pepper, smoked paprika, and chili flakes. I mix that with some flour and coat all the wings, put them in an oven proof dish with just a bit of canola oil and set them to cook.

After cooking (they get really crispy) i'll melt some butter, add some apple cider vinegar and a good hot sauce (usually franks).
I let that boil up and then just dip the cooked wings into it. They don't even need the sauce, the spices in the flour are enough flavor but the sauce is just too good to not have.


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