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Most Insane-est Hottest Burger Ever-est

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Post Tue Jul 23, 2013 11:27 pm
Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 741
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
1/2 lb. grass fed beef, habanero jam, Trinidad Scorpian Sauce, bhut jolokia flakes, fried jalapenos, red onion, Thai chili cream cheese, on a cayenne spiced Kaiser bun.
I ate one tonight grilled medium. Spicy but was very good. 24 ounces of hand dipped chocolate milkshake helped keep the heat in check.
Had to sign the standard waiver for eating something of this type releasing BAB, City of LaGrange, and State of Illinois (city and State because of business licenses) from any liability if eating this burger led to bodily injury, death, or "my esophagus falling out".
Back Alley Burger - www.backalleyburger.com - Check them out!
* IHP Cactus Farm & Sauce Shack *
18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
22 1/2" OTS
26 3/4" OTG

CharredGriller User avatar
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Posts: 5694
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
Wow - put some bacon on that and it would almost be worth the risk.... :twisted:

Seriously - that looks like a great burger joint. The menu is very nicely done and well planned. It's also fun without getting pretentious or getting too "foodie" like some places do, and even their hot dog looks good. (Actually, the hot dog looks very good indeed.)

Not sure if I'd try the Nutella shake more than twice, but the chocolate shake sounds like it did a good job of taming the fire. Chocolate shakes are one of my favorites for killing chili fire more than any other shake - the chocolate goes nicely with the chili pepper.

But the waiver might need a bit of work - was there anything in it regarding plumbing damage? :twisted:
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Old Smoker well done
well done

Posts: 1213
I understand that they suggest you put a pack of wet wipes in the freezer though before you need to use the can the next day..J/K :shock:
22.5 WSM - Chargriller - Traeger Texas
I cook to eat not to compete

CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
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Posts: 5694
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
Old Smoker wrote:
I understand that they suggest you put a pack of wet wipes in the freezer though before you need to use the can the next day..J/K :shock:


Thatt's a new one - I'll have to try it after this weekend. The guy at the market stall beside me on Saturdays is a Jamaican chef who now makes a ghost pepper (aka. bhut jolokia) sauce and I'm adding a bottle to my collection. :twisted:

What is worse is that I think he just got his hands on some Trinidad Moruga Scorpion peppers, which are now the hottest on the planet. I dread the day when he hands me a bottle and says "Try eet, mon!". :twisted:

My next of kin will post pics.... :D

BTW - love the signature, Old Smoker! :bbq:
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Seattle-Q well done
well done

Posts: 429
Location: Kirkland, WA
Do you win anything for finishing the burger? I like their menu also.

Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 741
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
Seattle-Q wrote:
Do you win anything for finishing the burger? I like their menu also.

Just the personal satisfaction of knowing that I finished the burger.
One thing I realized after eating this burger is there is so much going on in your mouth, mainly the heat, that you really do not get to enjoy the nuances of each pepper.
I have open bottles of both Trindad Scorpian and bhut jolokia hot sauces in my refrigerator. To be honest, I had them for a couple of months in my pantry before opening. They kind of scared me. You have to realize what they are but I enjoy these sauces. Served both with Sunday Family Dinner a couple weeks ago and my daughter-in-law was the only one who picked up on the fruity undertone of the Trinidad Scorpian. Almost immediately she said "I taste cherry." She has some Jamaican blood in her heritage.
BAB is a great burger place. Since they have been open I have eaten just about every burger on the menu and some of their un-menued special burgers.
* IHP Cactus Farm & Sauce Shack *
18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
22 1/2" OTS
26 3/4" OTG

CharredGriller User avatar
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Posts: 5694
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
Interesting - I just had lunch at the Jamaican booth at a local food festival today. The chef was there and his eyes bugged out when I put a big dollop of habanero sauce on my curried goat and said "Be careful. That stuff's HOT!".

So I poured some in a soup spoon and sipped it down. :twisted:

Turns out is was about as hot as Tabasco, but really, really tasty. I'm gonna drop by later and get the name of the sauce.

I guess my point here is: don't be too scared of a sauce unless it's an extract-based sauce (what I call a "pepper-spray sauce" because they use the extract in both products).
Most pure pepper sauces are very hot, but they aren't anywhere near the brain-searing (and what I consider cheating) heat of an extract sauce. At least theoretically a pure pepper-based sauce won't actually kill you although it will hurt a lot.
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 741
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
There are a number of good sauces that come from Jamaica and the Caribbean. Mentioned daughter-in-law's Jamaican heritage. She goes with her sister or husband about once a year. They always bring a sauce or jerk rub back for me. Their was a Jamaican company, Tijule Company LTD that was sampling their products in one of our local multi-ethnic grocery stores last Summer. Bought a couple bottles and some of their rub - sold under brand name Ned's Old Time. Quite good but store where they demonstrated went out of business before they got product placed. Have just about 1/5 bottle of a Sweet Pineapple Sauce left.
* IHP Cactus Farm & Sauce Shack *
18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
22 1/2" OTS
26 3/4" OTG

Old Smoker well done
well done

Posts: 1213
I'm not much of a "Enhanced sauce" person either. Some really are just to stinking hot to taste. I do like the flavor of Scotch Bonnet and Trinidad peppers, that subtle fruity sweetness at can be so misleading :lol: I also like the Yellow Hab and the there is another I think it's called Fanelli or something like that. I picked up a bottle of 5 pepper hot sauce at a little ice cream store a couple of weeks back and I'm here to tell you ,this stuff was awesomely good, who would have thought eh.
22.5 WSM - Chargriller - Traeger Texas
I cook to eat not to compete

CharredGriller User avatar
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Posts: 5694
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
Well, I spent the day at my regular Saturday booth at the market where I sell pens (my second "job"). The regular Jamaican chef who sells right beside me was there so I picked up a bottle of his habanero sauce, which was better than the stuff I tried Thursday.

He's now the second Jamaican chef in three days who has raised his eyebrows when I tried a spoonful of his sauce, too. Looks like I've built up quite a tolerance - blame the extract-based sauces I used to eat. :twisted:

But the real bonus was that he managed to bottle some more recipes, so I'm sitting here right now looking at a bottle of his ghost pepper sauce - really nice kick without being too offensively hot. Pics will follow in my old hot sauce post.

And the real icing on the cake is... he says he's got a line on some Trinidad Scorpion peppers, so he's going to experiment with them. I'm looking forward to his results.

So yeah - it's official: I'm a total chilehead now. :D
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 741
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
CharredGriller wrote:
Old Smoker wrote:
I understand that they suggest you put a pack of wet wipes in the freezer though before you need to use the can the next day..J/K :shock:


Thatt's a new one - I'll have to try it after this weekend. The guy at the market stall beside me on Saturdays is a Jamaican chef who now makes a ghost pepper (aka. bhut jolokia) sauce and I'm adding a bottle to my collection. :twisted:

What is worse is that I think he just got his hands on some Trinidad Moruga Scorpion peppers, which are now the hottest on the planet. I dread the day when he hands me a bottle and says "Try eet, mon!". :twisted:

My next of kin will post pics.... :D

BTW - love the signature, Old Smoker! :bbq:

CharredGriller - bhut jolokia is from India and Scorpian is from Caribbean. Two different peppers with similar scovillles.
* IHP Cactus Farm & Sauce Shack *
18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
22 1/2" OTS
26 3/4" OTG

Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 741
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
Next time she goes I'm going to have daughter-in-law try to bring some seeds back. Don't know how well they'll grow in Illinois. Guy on Facebook a week or so ago had plants. Not sure in northern Illinois about putting plants in in late July or early August.
Did the Wall of Flames Wings at Quaker Steak & Lube in Madison, WI suburb a couple years back. Enhanced sauce - pure fire - no taste. Got my name on the Wall but will not order them again. I do like Quaker Steak's Classic Buffalo. Was supposed to start opening a few Quaker Steak & Lube's in the Chicago area a few years ago - we even had tthe address on one supposedly under construction. When we started to check on one, it was vacant land that had just been surveyed. Think developer went broke - Nothing has ever been built on any of the sites available in this area.
* IHP Cactus Farm & Sauce Shack *
18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
22 1/2" OTS
26 3/4" OTG

CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5694
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
Cactus1 wrote:
CharredGriller - bhut jolokia is from India and Scorpian is from Caribbean. Two different peppers with similar scovillles.


True enough, but the seeds for both are becoming more readily available and with a bit if work most peppers can also be grown almost anywhere. Heck - I'm up in Canada in a 3b climate zone, but I've successfuly grown jalapenos, habaneros, Thai birds-eye peppers, and even red savinas over the years. If I manage to find seeds for bhut jolokias or Trinidad scorpions (which are apparently still hotter from all accounts I've read) I'll try to grow those too.

But I might not need to, either. I've seen both on the shelves in the stores here on rare occasions. We've got a great Italian grocery store chain up here that imports about 50 to 65 different varieties of peppers every year at the end of August and there's an excellent chance that at least one of those two varieties will be there. I managed to score 5 pounds of habaneros a couple years ago at $1.49 a pound, for example, and they're just about ready now to be turned into sauce (been curing for all that time in a strong brine). Maybe I'll get lucky. :D
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

Cactus1 well done
well done

Posts: 741
Location: Indian Head Park, IL.
CharredGriller wrote:
Cactus1 wrote:
CharredGriller - bhut jolokia is from India and Scorpian is from Caribbean. Two different peppers with similar scovillles.


True enough, but the seeds for both are becoming more readily available and with a bit if work most peppers can also be grown almost anywhere. Heck - I'm up in Canada in a 3b climate zone, but I've successfuly grown jalapenos, habaneros, Thai birds-eye peppers, and even red savinas over the years. If I manage to find seeds for bhut jolokias or Trinidad scorpions (which are apparently still hotter from all accounts I've read) I'll try to grow those too.

But I might not need to, either. I've seen both on the shelves in the stores here on rare occasions. We've got a great Italian grocery store chain up here that imports about 50 to 65 different varieties of peppers every year at the end of August and there's an excellent chance that at least one of those two varieties will be there. I managed to score 5 pounds of habaneros a couple years ago at $1.49 a pound, for example, and they're just about ready now to be turned into sauce (been curing for all that time in a strong brine). Maybe I'll get lucky. :D

Brining habaneros for a few years - that will be a great sauce. I usually mash mine and simmer in vinegar, let come to room temp, cover and let ferment for about a week before I finish off my sauce. Never have had much luck with plants from seeds.
If I could have gotten the Scorpian plants in late May or early June I would have given them a shot. Back in 1983 I lived in new construction rental townhouse in suburban Toledo that was built on a sand dune- developers completely stripped the topsoil and did not replace - sand as deep as I could dig. Had a 4' X 4' space off of my back door, bught some peat, and forget what else to enhance the soil and planted 4 jalapeno plants. Got what I called "Russian Roulette" peppers - some had very little heat, some were normal jalapeno, and some were way above. Got enough peppers to can 1/2 dozen or 8 pints. Fun to watch those who tried get a really hot ones.
Grow a lot of medium hot Hungarian Wax peppers in northeast Ohio where I'm originally from. Like to go back and can with my Dad, brother, and nephews. We did 3 bushels 2 years ago. Found a gypsy pepper, similar to the Hungarian Wax but smaller and sweeter, in my local produce store a month ago. I'd never seen them before so I bought six to try them out. Cleaned and sliced and stuffed in my last jar of brine from the two year ago wax peppers. Tasted them tonight and they are good. Bought another 18 peppers and have them in a different brine - I get to try them next Saturday. Like the Hungarian Wax in Ohio, the Gypsy must have a very short season because I only ever saw these peppers the two times I bought them. Wish I'd bought a bushel and canned more because I won't get to Oio for pepper season this year.
* IHP Cactus Farm & Sauce Shack *
18 1/2 & 22 1/2" WSM
22 1/2" OTS
26 3/4" OTG

CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5694
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
I couldn't quite figure out how McIlhenny's made their Tabasco sauce by salting down their peppers and such, so I tried a different method several years ago. I salted down a batch of cayennes and a few other hot red peppers really well and then added hot 7% vinegar, and then left them alone. That's actually being polite - I forgot about them for a few years, actually. :D

When I came upon the peppers again they were in good shape so I drained them and just blasted them in a blender. I used the leftover pickling liquid to thin out the resulting puree, and I wound up with something like a cross between Frank's Red Hot and Tabasco. It had the taste of Frank's but the heat of Tabasco, so I'd say it worked very well.

So a couple of years ago I figured I'd try it with 5 pounds of habaneros I picked up. They will be ready at the end of August so I'm looking forward to the results. :D
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

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