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Post a Question on the NEW "Ask Steven" Forum

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Steven Grilling Guru
Grilling Guru

Posts: 253

Do you have burning questions that need to be answered? A live-fire dilemma that needs to be solved? There are no secrets between grill masters. So I give you “Ask Steven,” a new forum, where you can ask me anything about food and flame.

Post your questions on the "Ask Steven" forum, and I'll respond as quickly as I can, though at times, because I'm traveling around Planet Barbecue (and you can ask me about these adventures too), it might take me a couple of days to reply.

YardBurner BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5365
Location: Damascus, Maryland
I guess I'll break the ice!

In your travels around the world tell us about
one of your "I'm not eating that", moments.

Or have you not had any?

-YB
Weber Summit E-470
Weber 22" MasterTouch
New Braunfels Hondo offset
Bar-B-Chef offset
Weber Jumbo Joe
Weber Q-220

Steven Grilling Guru
Grilling Guru

Posts: 253

Great question, YB. Thanks for asking.

In the course of my travels around Planet Barbecue, I've been faced with a great many weird foods hot off the grill. (The short list includes beef hearts in Peru, lamb intestines in Uruguay, a warm pigs blood and coconut salad in Bali (made after we slaughtered the pig for babi gluing), "Adidas" (grilled chickens feet in the Philippines), not to mention the fried crickets, grasshoppers, and termite eggs served as bar snacks as a prelude to barbecue in Mexico.

Oddly, the dish that gave me the most pause was a simple grilled chicken in Bangkok. I was the guest of honor at a cookout staged in a poor Esarn neighborhood. (The Esarns come from the Thai-Laotian border and are reputed to be Thailand's best grillers.) I went into the kitchen, as I always do, to watch the preparations. The kitchen window overlooked a stagnant canal with floating animal carcasses and it had no screen. Flies buzzed in and out of the window around and on the food. I'm a pretty adventurous eater with a high tolerance for funkiness, but this was one of filthiest kitchens I've ever set foot in.

Nonetheless, come mealtime, I was given the seat of honor at the head of the table. The chicken came hot off a coconut shell charcoal burning rotisserie. The skin was the color of polished teak. The aroma was incredible. Condensation beaded on the Singha bottles in the sweltering Thai heat. My hosts (day laborers, like so many Esarns are) had obviously spent way beyond their means to lay out a lunch to show off their grilling skills. I looked around at all this hospitality and did the only thing a polite guest could do under such circumstances. I ate.

I can't say I enjoyed the meal entirely--I was too worried about the gastrointestinal consequences, but I did try to clean my plate. And whether it was the God of Barbecue looking favorably on me--or simply the purifying heat of the charcoal fire--but I didn't get sick.

Moral of the story: sometimes in barbecue, as in life, you have to do the right thing, even if it isn't the smart thing.

beercuer User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 2268
Location: Southern Californy
Steven, you've made beef jerky before, yes? What is your preferred cut of meat and smoking wood? :cheers: :bbq:
Got beer???

Post Tue Dec 24, 2013 10:52 am
Steven Grilling Guru
Grilling Guru

Posts: 253

After admiring at your photos in the December block party, it looks like you’ve mastered beef jerky. (I’m hungry and I just ate breakfast!) But to answer your specific question, I like sirloin or bottom round sliced as thin as possible on a meat slicer. (I ask my butcher to do it.) Any hardwood will work, but I have a weakness for cherry.

Some of my favorite beef jerky comes from Vietnam, where it’s seasoned with lemongrass, garlic, chilies sugar, black pepper—and here’s the kicker—fish sauce. (You know, that malodorous but tasty condiment made from pickled anchovies that’s loaded with umami flavors.) It’s sweet, spicy, and salty and it takes jerky to a whole new level. The recipe is in Barbecue Bible on page 68.

Happy holidays!

SR

beercuer User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 2268
Location: Southern Californy
Steven, I thank you most kindly for your response. I hear you about the slicer-- I slice mine by hand with a knife, and I never envy myself that task.

Thanks for the hot tip from The Barbecue Bible. Cool!... I never thought to use fish sauce-- just soy and Lea & Perrins Worcestershire sauces.
Got beer???

Post Thu Apr 10, 2014 6:34 pm

Posts: 1
I am considering roasting a whole pineapple in the embers--spiny leaves and all. Have you seen this done on any point along the BBQ Trail? What sort of advice could you offer on the topic?

Thanks,
BBQTrailblazer

Post Sat Apr 12, 2014 7:27 am
timbarber84 medium
medium

Posts: 165
Location: flatwoods ky

hi steven i am looking for a good recipe for hole vidilai onion s i know how i would do it bbq sauce and bacon but i would like to get another one.also i went to whites custom meats and picked up some buffalo wings theay where great not to hot but plenty of flavor can you recomend a good rub i coldent find one in your book sauces rubs and marinades
TIMS BBQ


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