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Chicken Thighs cooked in a Muffin Tin

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Post Tue Jul 01, 2014 12:24 am
BchrisL User avatar
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Location: Northern Virginia
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Hello,

I saw a lot of this method of cooking chicken thighs recently at a KCBS competition. I did a little looking on the web and found a few videos
on the subject.

I tried six in a muffin tin on the egg today. Overall they were very tasty and their presentation on the plate was quite pleasing. The skin was browned nicely and looked beautiful. It was TOUGH! The skin was like shoe leather. I usually have corrected for poor skin texture by cooking with a faster cooker temp and my turning the pieces after an hour, but these presented me with a new method and challenge.

My regular method of cooking chicken thighs does not include boning or removing fat from the piece and I wonder if the fat under the skin plays a part in creating that crispy skin that is so good.

If you guys have any thoughts I would certainly like to improve on the results I got today.

Chris
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CharredGriller User avatar
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BchrisL wrote:
My regular method of cooking chicken thighs does not include boning or removing fat from the piece and I wonder if the fat under the skin plays a part in creating that crispy skin that is so good.

If you guys have any thoughts I would certainly like to improve on the results I got today.

Chris


Yes it does. The fat is essential for crispy skin, combined with higher temps.
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.

ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
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Location: Stoughton, WI
Chris, the fat under the skin is the best part...sometimes I even augment it with a little butter just to be sure there's enough! :wink:

What temperature did you cook the thighs at? I think it was Myron Mixon that either developed or popularized the method but I'm not sure what temperature he recommends.

Post Wed Jul 02, 2014 11:42 pm
BchrisL User avatar
medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 79
Location: Northern Virginia
ScreamingChicken wrote:
Chris, the fat under the skin is the best part...sometimes I even augment it with a little butter just to be sure there's enough! :wink:

What temperature did you cook the thighs at? I think it was Myron Mixon that either developed or popularized the method but I'm not sure what temperature he recommends.


Thanks for the reply Screaming,

I cooked them around 325 to 350 in the egg. I think I am not going to remove the fat for underside the skin again. They looked really good, like the skin had cooked enough, but alas that was not the case.

Yes it was Myron Mixon who talks about them. I have a new family member who doesn't like bones in their chicken, so I was experimenting with boned chicken. I have done some more research on the web on this subject and found a couple of things I am going to try, in addition to the fat under the skin, the next time I try this dish. It really presents well, especially in a more formal setting. They are quite easy to eat with a knife and fork. I served them up with a Alabama white sauce and baked potato with sour cream butter and chives, garnished with parsley.

I will post any new discoveries I make as I continue to work on this.

Chris
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When I was a kid my grandma use to have these small bread pans that she would make chicken breast in.

She would get a pack of bone-in breast and de-bone (saving bones for stock) and make a compound butter with herbs from garden and stuff under the skin then put them in the mini-bread pans. Then she would bake them in the oven, man this brings back memories

May have to make these again, was not until I seen this post that it reminded me of those meals

ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
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Sounds like Myron Mixon might owe your grandma some royalty cash. :wink:

Have you ever thought of trying this on the grill? I think the hardest part would be finding a pan, so maybe use a small disposable aluminum version?

BchrisL User avatar
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Posts: 79
Location: Northern Virginia
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I found the problem. My thermometer had twisted the gauge on the stalk. I took it out today and checked it in boiling water, and sure enough it was out. I snapped this as it was cooling down after the cook.

There is a little black mark on the very edge of the bezel that marks 212 degrees, and there is a locknut under the dial. I dipped the stalk into boiling water and waited for a couple of minutes and twisted the dial to read exactly on the mark.

Redid the chicken tonight.......NAILED THAT SUCKER! Crispy skin and tender moist meat. I cooked it at 325 to 350 to an internal temp,of 205. I wanted to pull it off at 195, but because it was running faster than I was used to at the old temp setting, it went a little quicker than I was used to and it fooled me.
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ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
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Location: Stoughton, WI
Good job solving the problem! So prior to the fix the therm was reading higher than it should've?

Post Mon Jul 07, 2014 12:22 am
BchrisL User avatar
medium-rare
medium-rare

Posts: 79
Location: Northern Virginia
ScreamingChicken wrote:
Good job solving the problem! So prior to the fix the therm was reading higher than it should've?

Yes the gauge was reading about 50 degrees higher than the actual temps it was sensing. I must have bumped the dial at some point in the past.
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