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Cleaning porcelain and stainless steel grill

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anne17821 raw
raw

Posts: 1
This year my husband and I bought a Viking stainless steel grill with porcelain grill grates. The grill is great, but it is a bear to clean. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to clean the stainless steel portion so that it does not take an entire day to clean. Also, I have in the past cleaned the porcelain grill grates with Oven cleaner, however, it takes two or three applications of the oven cleaner (with scrubbing in the utility sink in between applications). Anyone know of a quicker and easier way of cleaning these grates?

Thanks,
Anne P.

Post Mon Aug 25, 2003 10:00 pm
PaulP well done
well done

Posts: 681
Location: Beautiful St. Mary's County, Maryland
Can't help with the stainless steel part. I wonder what kind of cleaning you are try to do on it. SS should only require an occassional wipe-down with detergent to get the grease off.

The grates are a whole different story. You do not want to scrub the grates. As you use grates, they acquire a coating that makes them virtually non-stick. Very much like a cast-iron skillet. Washing or hard brushing removes this coating, making it more likely that your food will stick. Here's how you clean grates. When you are ready to cook, turn all burners on and heat the grill hot (500 - 600 degrees). This reduce any residue from the last cook to ashes, and the heat will kill any bacteria hanging around. While the heat is still on, lightly brush the grates with a long-handled brass bristle brush to remove any pieces of debris left there, oil the grate with a paper towel dipped in oil (hold it with tongs), and cook. If you're very fastidious, brush lightly at the end of the cook. I don't do this because it gets my brush clogged with grease and oil. That's all you need to do the clean the grates.

A cover will keep the outside clean between uses.

Post Tue Aug 26, 2003 6:11 am
Longmill

Agree with the previous poster.... stop "cleaning" your grill.

FWIW, I don't have a stainless steel grill, but I've been working since May to get a good seasoning in mine. When I got it, I started the process by spraying the entire interior with Pam. With 20/20 hindsight, wish I had wiped it down with peanut oil. Ran it empty for the first couple of hours to burn off any factory protective coatings.

Since the first cook, the only thing I've done to the interior is clean out the ashes, wipe off any excess grease, and scrape the cast iron grates. (Same approach with my gas grill, just don't have to deal with the ashes.) At first, I also sprayed the interior with a couple more coats of Pam between cooking sessions. Re-oiled the grates as a part of the cleanup, too.

The interior of the grill is getting that brown carmelized coloring throughout. As with a well seasoned cast iron pan, eventually it will turn black. Should already be that way, but we've had too much rain for as much grilling as I would have liked to do. The cast iron grates are almost seasoned to the point I'm trying to reach. (Smooth non stick surface with no traces of rust between uses.)

Since my grills (gas & charcoal) are painted, I've wiped them down with peanut oil on the outside. Let them sit in the sun for a few hours. Then, using paper towels wiped off any excess oil. This puts a thin protective film on the paint, bolt heads, and other components. That helps deflect any damage from condensation that DOES occur under plastic grill covers. Don't know for sure, but from what I understand, it also helps keep the paint more flexible so it'll resist chipping and peeling. (Waited until the paint was completely cured according to the manufacturer's instructions before doing this.)

While these comments on the exterior may not apply to your grill, I've seen many store display models of "stainless steel" grills with rust. Don't know if because of the grade of SS or combinations of SS and non-SS components in the assembly. I'm sure someone will correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe a thin coating of peanut oil or mineral oil on the outside of a SS grill will prolong its life.

If you're doing so much cleaning for food safety, it isn't necessary. As you probably already know, meats are safe when they reach internal temperatures ranging from 140° to 180°F. Your grill reaches temperatures much, much higher than that. Pre-heating your grill sanitizes it for the next cooking session. Just scrape off any charded bits that may be clinging to your grates.

Relax and enjoy cooking on your grill. Think of it like a new pick-up truck. When it's new, you hate to have a scratch or ding in the bed of the truck. But, after you get a few of those, you'll begin to really enjoy using the truck for its intended purpose. Those scratches and scrapes don't matter any more. Same principal applies to your grill.

In closing, my suggestion and recommendation is to give your grill a thorough cleaning, maybe a couple of times a year, at most, depending on how often you cook. Even with this, don't remove the seasoning. Wipe everything down with a mild cleaner, rinse thoroughly, apply peanut oil to any rust points.

Sorry to be so long winded this morning, but I hope it helps you to get more enjoyment out of your grill with far less work!

Longmill

Post Sat Aug 30, 2003 5:26 pm
Ranger One

I was grilling pineapple slices, and noticed that all of the build up comes off on the pineapple. Well, now I use the leftovers, (husk, core, whatever) from pineapples to clean mine off!

Post Sat Sep 06, 2003 4:42 pm

Posts: 14
Location: milford CT

i think you can clean porcline grates in the oven on the self cleaning cycle
eat, drink and be merry for tomorrow we'll die

tybee317 raw
raw

Posts: 2
Location: HotLanta, GA
:| We had a freak grilling accident come to the hospital last week. A Guy had scraped his grill with an old brass bristle brush, evidently he failed to wipe down grill with oil and paper towel. One of the tines from the old brush had broken off and become one with his food. The tine became lodged in his throat, narrowly missing his carotid artery. He had to have a full neck dissection to remove tine! Freak grilling accident but PSA for keeping your grill surface clean and using good equipment.
Charbroil aka ECB
Weber Silver 22.5
Wally World gas grill

ScreamingChicken BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 7556
Location: Stoughton, WI
I've heard several of those stories and they're pretty unnerving. Wiping the grate with a cloth or paper towel after brushing, whether it's oiled or not, is a good idea for this reason.

I'm someone who tries to get the maximum use out of something before throwing it away but once the brush head starts to show signs of loosening bristles it's time to replace it.

CharredGriller User avatar
BBQ Deputy
BBQ Deputy

Posts: 5898
Location: Central Alberta, Canada
tybee317 wrote:
:| We had a freak grilling accident come to the hospital last week. A Guy had scraped his grill with an old brass bristle brush, evidently he failed to wipe down grill with oil and paper towel. One of the tines from the old brush had broken off and become one with his food. The tine became lodged in his throat, narrowly missing his carotid artery. He had to have a full neck dissection to remove tine! Freak grilling accident but PSA for keeping your grill surface clean and using good equipment.


Apparently there are hundreds of cases each year admitted to emergency wards like this. These don't just involve brass bristles stuck in peoples throats but also in their stomachs and intestines. Some cases are apparently fatal as well.

I have a couple more points to add here:

1) Use Steven's grill scraper first. It gets off the heavy baked-on bits first so you don't have to brush as much. And if the grate is bare of oil, then oil it first and this eliminates all chances of scraping off iron filings too.
http://www.grilling4all.com/sm8818.html

The funny thing is that when I originally saw this tool I thought it was a bit gimmicky. But after I used it on both the wire grates on my little Weber Smokey Joe Platinum as well as the big CI grates on my Outlaw, it actually became the #1 tool in my grill-cleaning toolkit.

2) Get a decent brush. Those little dollar-store or other el-cheapo grill brushes melt and lose their bristles way too easily. For example, my father bought 3 for $5 and thought they were a great deal until they melted on the first cleaning and left bristles all over the grill.

Now, I don't have Steven's monster grill brush (yet) but it's a great brush - I've used one. Currently I use a $20 grill brush with high-heat removable brushes. As soon as one brush head starts showing signs of wear I pop it out and pop in a new one.

Now I don't have a link to this grill brush but it's got a black handle with red brush inserts. The only other thing I'd suggest is to keep buying and trying grill brushes until you find a really good one, then stock up.

Oh - and don 't use stainless brushes on CI or porcelain grill grates - use brass ones and save the SS brushes for SS grates. Stsainless stell is too hard for CI as it cuts right through the seasoning, and way too hard for porcelain-coated (it cuts through the coating and that coating then flakes off (and gets in your food!).

The last bit is something I have painful experience with. I had a relative who used a SS brush on his porcelain grates. It etched the coating, which later flaked off. I wound up getting a 2-inch spike of porcelain stuck in my gums after eating one of his steaks. No permanent damage but it really ruined the cookout.
Unlike propane, you'll never wake up scorched and naked in another county because you mishandled a bag of briquettes.


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