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Beef Brisket

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Post Mon Jan 26, 2004 4:54 pm
willisamrhein

Are there different types of beef brisket? I'm not referring to types of cut. I tried to smoke a brisket last night and it was terrible. The only thing I could find at the grocery store was a "corned beef brisket". My wife said this was the same thing as beef brisket so I tried it. It was smoked for 6 hours with the temp 225-250. It came out very tough and extremely pink. I have had brisket several times before at a restaraunt and it was always very tender and brown in color, like a steak. Any thoughts or help. I suspect I bought the wrong meat. By the way, the packaging said it was a flat cut. Thanks for the help.

Post Mon Jan 26, 2004 6:05 pm
BBcue-Z well done
well done

Posts: 3030
Location: Atlanta-GA
There is a big difference between Corned Beef and plain Brisket. They both come from the same cut, but Corned beef is cured meat. It will remain pink no matter how long you cook it. The best way to cook corned beef is to boil it or braise it for 3-4 hrs. That’s what you’d cook on St. Patrice’s day with cabbage. You could start corned beef in a water smoker for the first hour of cooking, and then finish it in liquid.
Try the process again with plain (unprocessed) brisket. Cook it long and slow. I usually cook mine for 10-12 hours. Don’t forget the rub and the mop, they’re very important for moist and tasty brisket.
You can check the following web site for detail explanation of the process: http://www.smokering.net/.
Better yet, get Steve’s book “How to Grill” and read all about it.
Good Luck.

Post Mon Jan 26, 2004 6:47 pm
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
willisamrhein, Howdy!

Brisket is an excellent hunk of meat when properly prepared. It is also one of the most cantankerous cuts of beef there is. I must second BBcue-Z suggestion for low and slow. Your temperatures of 225-250 are good. But when you take a brisket out after only six hours, it will be cooked but not tender. The marbling in the meat will still have a high fatty content and the meat will be chewy/spongy. I also cook a brisket for 10 to 12 hours, monitoring temperatures all the while. It is important to keep the meat moist while cooking so you’ll want to mop it every hour. Don’t open the smoker any more often than once an hour. Each time you open it you’ll be adding 5 to 10 minutes to the cooking time because your smoker will lose a lot of heat and have to heat back up. Have fuel and smoking wood on hand when mopping the meat so you can add it quickly then. I hope this helps! Feel free to join the obsession!
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Post Tue Jan 27, 2004 12:03 am
spfranz well done
well done

Posts: 615
Location: Minnesota

I agree totally with Bob and BBcue-Z. The only thing I'd add is to let the brisket go until hits 190-195 degrees. I've had this take as long as 20 hours. It will stall out at about 165 for a while, this is a good thing. Just let it ride. Once it hits that 190-195 mark, take it out, wrap it in foil, then in a towel, then put it in a cooler for about an hour or two. It will stay good this way for a while if you need to haul it someplace. Take it out and slice it and enjoy!

Scott
I like vegetarians. Some of my favorite foods are vegetarians.

Post Mon Feb 02, 2004 1:18 am
Rick rare
rare

Posts: 47
Location: Oregon
Hey all--What size of brisket are you all starting out with?

Rick

Post Mon Feb 23, 2004 9:25 pm
Rick rare
rare

Posts: 47
Location: Oregon
Gee, thanks for all the input!!!!

Rick

Post Tue Feb 24, 2004 12:00 am
spfranz well done
well done

Posts: 615
Location: Minnesota

Rick - the only brisket I ever seem to be able to find here is the flat and they run about 8 pounds or so.

Scott
I like vegetarians. Some of my favorite foods are vegetarians.

Post Tue Feb 24, 2004 12:43 am
ThrRoff well done
well done

Posts: 999
Location: Washington, DC

Chiming in on the brisket. I will agree with spfranz and Bob. For a good brisket – that’s about 5 pounds of meat – you are talking 10 to 12 hours in the smoker using the techniques they suggest. Most supermarket meat counters sell their briskets severely trimmed of fat. Make friends with a good butcher and get a brisket cut with all of the fat still on it. All of that fat will melt away in the smoker, and the result should be fantastic.
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Post Tue Feb 24, 2004 12:56 am
spfranz well done
well done

Posts: 615
Location: Minnesota

Good point about the fat cap ThrRoff. Something else that works quite nicely for that extra fat if you have a multi-level smoker is to put a pork butt or two on the top rack with the briskett underneath. All of that lovely pork fat melts off onto the brisket.

Scott
I like vegetarians. Some of my favorite foods are vegetarians.

Post Tue Feb 24, 2004 1:10 am
Airfoils well done
well done

Posts: 1063
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Last edited by Airfoils on Fri Sep 09, 2005 2:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Post Wed Feb 25, 2004 3:41 am
Rick rare
rare

Posts: 47
Location: Oregon
Thanks for picking back up on this guys. I am close to a butcher, and I got 2 briskets from him two weeks ago untrimmed. Nice fat cap on those babies, about 8 pounds apiece. by the time I was done cooking them (about 15 hours to get to 190 degrees), I only had about 6 pounds of meat left for the two. It sure made a difference having the fat on there to flavor and keep the meat from drying out, but you have to take that in to consideration when you are pricing the meat and figuring out how much you will get out of it.

Rick

Post Tue Jun 28, 2005 10:25 pm
calamec rare
rare

Posts: 13
I cooked a 4-5- pound brisket the other weekend using charcoal pit. I smoked the brisket 4-5 hours, wrapped and cooked an additonal 3 hours. During the first 4-5 hours, I religiously mopped the brisket every hour. After 4 hours I wrapped the brisket and cooked an additonal 3 hours

The brisket was moist, flavorful, but over-cooked. Can you tell me when you wrap the briskett and place it back on the grill, how long do you leave the briskett on the grill?

Craig

Post Wed Jun 29, 2005 8:35 am
Bob-BQN User avatar
well done
well done

Posts: 12904
Location: Texas
Craig I usually cook whole packer briskets, it sounds like you had the flat only. I know several that recommend wrapping at 160* but I like to wait until the plateau is over so as to not rush or disturb it and wrap the brisket at 170-175*. Then I continue to cook it until it reaches 195*.

If you don't mind me asking, you said the brisket was moist and flavorful, what was the indication that it was overcooked?
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Post Wed Jun 29, 2005 8:48 am
searcymanoffire well done
well done

Posts: 483
Location: ARKANSAS

I agree If It was Moist & flavorful what made you Fell as if it were over done?

I bought a 12 pounder lastnight..Doin'er her tomorrow.
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Smoke in your eyes only Burns if it ain't from a smoker

Post Wed Jun 29, 2005 9:13 am
DiggRguy rare
rare

Posts: 37
Location: Eastern NC
All of the briskets I have seen have been trimmed of the fat cap. Dont know wny butchers. Any hints or ideas?
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