Steven Raichlen's Barbecue! Bible

Beef

Biggest Baddest Beef Recipes: Beef Shoulder Clod

Biggest Baddest Beef Recipes: Beef Shoulder Clod

Barbecuers seem to give pork shoulder (a.k.a. Boston butt) all the love, ignoring its beef counterpart, shoulder clod. That’s a shame, because it’s easy to cook, drop-dead gorgeous to serve, and if you love beef, a slice of this tender, crusty, smoky meat will make you feel like you’ve died and gone to heaven. Get the recipe for Texas Clod (Barbecued Beef Shoulder). Haven’t heard of it? Clod is one of the sacred meats...

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Beef Brisket Made Easy

Beef Brisket Made Easy

Photo by Richard Dallett. Brisket. Few words have such power to make mouths water and stomachs roar with hunger. Brisket is the summum of Texas barbecue and its popularity extends far beyond the Lone Star State. Food writers and pit masters like to mystify the process, making smoking a brisket sound as difficult as quantum physics. Well, I’m going to let you in on a little secret: Brisket is easy, requiring maybe 30 minutes of actual work from start to finish. True, that start to finish can stretch as long as 16 hours. But armed with the right tools (a sharp knife, a remote digital thermometer, and unlined butcher...

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Your Guide to Heritage Meats

Your Guide to Heritage Meats

Left two photos by Edsel Little via Creative Commons. Right photo by Jim Richardson. If you’re a fan of the TV show Portlandia, you’ll remember the first episode where Peter and Nance pepper a restaurant server with questions about the chicken they are about to order. The waitress obliges them with the chicken’s photo and curriculum vitae—the fowl’s name is “Colin”—and he was raised, we learn, on a farm just south of Portland. Peter and Nance put a hold on the table and excuse themselves to check...

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12 Bad Dogs: The Hot Dog Goes Global

12 Bad Dogs: The Hot Dog Goes Global

National Hot Dog Day is Thursday, July 23. Now you know. Time to teach that old dog some new tricks. And doing the teaching: my cousin, David Raichlen. (Perhaps you know his chocolate chipotle ribs in my book Best Ribs Ever.) Anthropology professor at the University of Arizona by day (he’s currently in Tanzania researching hunter gatherers), and barbecue addict nights and weekends, Dave introduced me to a cross-cultural food phenomenon taking southern Arizona by storm: the Sonoran hot dog. Said dog comes wrapped and cooked in bacon, jammed onto a soft sweet roll under a deluge of charros (stewed beans), grilled green onions and jalapeños,...

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10 Steps to Grilling the Perfect Porterhouse, T-Bone or Any Really Thick Steak

10 Steps to Grilling the Perfect Porterhouse, T-Bone or Any Really Thick Steak

Photo by _BuBBy_ on Flickr via Creative Commons. In our last blog post, we explained the difference between a porterhouse and a T-bone steak. Today we cover the 10 steps to grilling the perfect T-bone or porterhouse—no matter how thick. Use a combo grilling method for a combo steak: If cooking over charcoal (and I hope you are), set up a three-zone fire. Dump a chimney of lit coals into the grill. With a grill hoe or garden hoe, spread the coals into a double layer at the far side and a single layer in the center. Leave the section closest to you coal-free. Replace...

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T-Bones and Porterhouses: What’s the Difference?

T-Bones and Porterhouses: What’s the Difference?

Above photos by Snake River Farms. T-bones and porterhouses are a steak lover’s nirvana—a New York strip and a tenderloin, a.k.a. filet mignon, connected by a gnaw-worthy T-shaped bone. But what’s the difference? a viewer asked after watching a video of me grilling Caveman T-Bones. Are they different names for the same steak? A “tomato-tomahto” thing whereby Texans call it T-bone and Yankees name it porterhouse? I understand the confusion. The steaks can look almost identical. Both...

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How to Choose the Best Ribeye (Cowboy) Steaks

How to Choose the Best Ribeye (Cowboy) Steaks

From our friends at Strauss Brands who brought us What Is Grass-Fed Beef and What’s So Great About It? and provided the beef for Project Smoke come two helpful videos on steak: Butchery 101: From 107 Rib to Cowboy Steak Americans love a great steak, and the ribeye is our king cut. Resident grass-fed beef experts Mark Goessl and Lori Dunn explain the fabrication of the beef rib primal cut into bone-in ribeye steaks or cowboy steaks. These...

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Extreme Grilling: Steak Six Ways

Extreme Grilling: Steak Six Ways

Photo by Forres Meadows. You’re a confident griller of steaks. You’ve mastered New York strips, you can handle flank steak, and on several occasions, have produced magazine centerfold-worthy porterhouses. Now it’s time to tackle extreme steak grilling: That means on a shovel, grilled over spruce branches, wrapped in hay, in a salt and cloth crust, on a pitchfork, and my favorite—grilled directly on the embers. For obvious reasons, we’re going to have to leave out steaks grilled over a trough of molten...

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10 Steps to the Perfect Burger

10 Steps to the Perfect Burger

May 28 is coming fast and you know what that means: National Hamburger Day. Not that anyone in this community needs inducement to put America’s favorite ground meat to the fire. The stats are in and not steak, not bratwurst, not ribs, but burgers top the list of our favorite foods on the grill for Memorial Day. So here’s the question: What constitutes the perfect burger? For me, it starts with a live fire (preferably wood) to produce a perfectly charred, deftly seasoned crust and a juicy interior that contrasts perfectly with a soft,...

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Home-Smoked Pastrami, Part 2

Home-Smoked Pastrami, Part 2

Photo by jeffreyw via Creative Commons. Recently we told you about the fascinating history of pastrami. (Hint—it involves camels, geese, and beef navels.) This time I’m going to reveal the 8 steps to pastrami nirvana, complete with my fail-proof recipe for pastrami you cook like barbecued brisket. The only other thing you need is mustard. The meat: The traditional cut for pastrami is beef navel—a rectangular muscle richly striated with fat from the underbelly of the steer and typically...

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