Steven Raichlen's Barbecue! Bible

Pork

Ribs in a Hurry: 5 Great Techniques

Ribs in a Hurry: 5 Great Techniques

Ribs—crusty with spices, fragrant with wood smoke, sizzling with fat and caramelized sauce—invoke the spirit of barbecue like no other meat. Plus, they are unabashedly fun to eat, channeling through our DNA the same hand-to-mouth pleasure our cave-dwelling ancestors experienced after they embraced the power of live-fire cooking. Bet you could go for a slab right now. But wait—it’s a weeknight. And ribs take hours and hours to cook, right? Yes and no. If you’re a devotee of the enormously...

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For Your Easter Table: Ham in a Hurry

For Your Easter Table: Ham in a Hurry

Ham is hog’s leap to immortality. But that leap takes time. From a few weeks for your basic cooked ham to up to a year or more for a truly great dry-cured, cold-smoked ham like Italian speck or German schwartzwelder schinken (Black Forest ham). Even the “fast” version of the Smokehouse Shoulder Ham I demonstrated on Project Smoke last season requires a week of curing and 24 hours of smoking. But what if there was a ham you could cure in...

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Five Regional Barbecue Sauces for Pulled Pork

Five Regional Barbecue Sauces for Pulled Pork

Pork shoulder is one of the cornerstones of American barbecue—right up there with brisket and ribs. It’s certainly the most flexible: you can smoke it. Indirect grill it. Spit-roast it on a rotisserie. It’s also the most forgiving: it stays moist even when you overcook it. And in my book—make that books!—pulled pork is pork shoulder’s highest calling. Rubbed with salt and spices, blasted with wood smoke, periodically mopped with vinegar or beer, and finally, shredded with meat claws or pulled...

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Try This: Smoked Mexican Barbacoa

Try This: Smoked Mexican Barbacoa

You could call it Mexico’s version of soup and a sandwich. But you would be seriously understating barbacoa’s charms. Few Americans—with the exception of some who hail from South Texas—have ever tried barbacoa (Or even heard of it.) And those who have can’t be sure if they’ve had an authentic experience or not. Because like so many dishes in the barbecue pantheon, barbacoa has been reinterpreted by contemporary cultures—in Mexico alone, from Puebla to the Yucatán, it has morphed into something...

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How to Make the Perfect Pot of Chili—Start with Barbecued Meat

How to Make the Perfect Pot of Chili—Start with Barbecued Meat

Sometimes the best comfort foods come ladled from a pot—especially during the freeze of February. Speaking of pots, everyone should know how to cook up a pot of chili. Fierce controversies surround what constitutes the perfect bowl o’ red. Texans prefer all-beef chili—ideally, with meat cubed rather than ground—and points are deducted for adding beans and other fillers. In New Mexico it’s the chile peppers that matter and some versions don’t even...

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Grilled Pork Porterhouses with Newcastle Brown Ale and Mustard—A New Holiday Classic

Grilled Pork Porterhouses with Newcastle Brown Ale and Mustard—A New Holiday Classic

All photos by Rob Baas. This blog post is brought to you with support from our sponsor, Newcastle Brown Ale, who provided the samples and advertising support. Beer and barbecue. It’s not just for summertime. Thousands of members of this barbecue community routinely shovel a path to their snow-covered grills and smokers. And hoisting a cold one with your gloved hands to your lips is an excellent way to defy winter. The holiday season...

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Perfect for the Holidays: Suckling Pig

Perfect for the Holidays: Suckling Pig

All photos by Rob Baas. First he gave us the “McRob” (a real boneless barbecued rib sandwich). Then his unique twist on the onion bomb (hint: it involves both onions and bell peppers). BBQ U alum, Project Smoke grill wrangler, and recipe tester extraordinaire Rob Baas is always up for a challenge. So in honor of the holidays, we asked him to smoke a whole suckling pig. (Said pig recipe will appear in my forthcoming Project Smoke book, due out in May 2016.) Looking for a dish to...

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Autumn in New England on the Grill

Autumn in New England on the Grill

As any Yankee (or adopted Yankee like me) knows, fall is the glory time in New England—clear crisp days and nights cool enough to light the fireplace. My friend and fellow New Englander, Sarah Leah Chase, knows a thing or two about autumn in the Bay State and she celebrates with a dish members of this barbecue community can relate to: sage-rubbed, wood-grilled pork chops with blue cheese and Concord grapes. –Steven According to headlines in my local newspaper,...

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Ribs with a Rub (and Maybe a Glaze)

Ribs with a Rub (and Maybe a Glaze)

From time to time, we ask friends and colleagues to write guest blog posts for BarbecueBible.com. Today’s post—on rubs and ribs—is by Katie Workman, author of Dinner Solved! and The Mom 100 Cookbook. If the name sounds familiar, it is—Katie’s father, Peter Workman, founded Workman Publishing, publisher of her books and my Barbecue! Bible cookbook series. Note: Katie uses a two-step cooking process designed for apartment...

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10 Indispensable Tips from Brooklyn Sausage Master (and New York Times Rave) Jake Klein

10 Indispensable Tips from Brooklyn Sausage Master (and New York Times Rave) Jake Klein

“The Tokyo chicken number (juicy, salty and spicy from shishito peppers) is the most appealing chicken sausage I can remember,” wrote restaurant critic Pete Wells in a recent New York Times story. He went on to describe the double smoked brisket sausage as a “phenomenal piece of barbecue, packing more smoke into a sausage than I’d thought possible.” You got that right, Mr. Wells. Jake Klein, owner of Jake’s Handcrafted in South Slope, Brooklyn,...

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