Steven Raichlen's Barbecue! Bible

Pork

Grilled Pork Porterhouses with Newcastle Brown Ale and Mustard—A New Holiday Classic

Grilled Pork Porterhouses with Newcastle Brown Ale and Mustard—A New Holiday Classic

All photos by Rob Baas. This blog post is brought to you with support from our sponsor, Newcastle Brown Ale, who provided the samples and advertising support. Beer and barbecue. It’s not just for summertime. Thousands of members of this barbecue community routinely shovel a path to their snow-covered grills and smokers. And hoisting a cold one with your gloved hands to your lips is an excellent way to defy winter. The holiday season...

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Perfect for the Holidays: Suckling Pig

Perfect for the Holidays: Suckling Pig

All photos by Rob Baas. First he gave us the “McRob” (a real boneless barbecued rib sandwich). Then his unique twist on the onion bomb (hint: it involves both onions and bell peppers). BBQ U alum, Project Smoke grill wrangler, and recipe tester extraordinaire Rob Baas is always up for a challenge. So in honor of the holidays, we asked him to smoke a whole suckling pig. (Said pig recipe will appear in my forthcoming Project Smoke book, due out in May 2016.) Looking for a dish to...

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Autumn in New England on the Grill

Autumn in New England on the Grill

As any Yankee (or adopted Yankee like me) knows, fall is the glory time in New England—clear crisp days and nights cool enough to light the fireplace. My friend and fellow New Englander, Sarah Leah Chase, knows a thing or two about autumn in the Bay State and she celebrates with a dish members of this barbecue community can relate to: sage-rubbed, wood-grilled pork chops with blue cheese and Concord grapes. –Steven According to headlines in my local newspaper,...

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Ribs with a Rub (and Maybe a Glaze)

Ribs with a Rub (and Maybe a Glaze)

From time to time, we ask friends and colleagues to write guest blog posts for BarbecueBible.com. Today’s post—on rubs and ribs—is by Katie Workman, author of Dinner Solved! and The Mom 100 Cookbook. If the name sounds familiar, it is—Katie’s father, Peter Workman, founded Workman Publishing, publisher of her books and my Barbecue! Bible cookbook series. Note: Katie uses a two-step cooking process designed for apartment...

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10 Indispensable Tips from Brooklyn Sausage Master (and New York Times Rave) Jake Klein

10 Indispensable Tips from Brooklyn Sausage Master (and New York Times Rave) Jake Klein

“The Tokyo chicken number (juicy, salty and spicy from shishito peppers) is the most appealing chicken sausage I can remember,” wrote restaurant critic Pete Wells in a recent New York Times story. He went on to describe the double smoked brisket sausage as a “phenomenal piece of barbecue, packing more smoke into a sausage than I’d thought possible.” You got that right, Mr. Wells. Jake Klein, owner of Jake’s Handcrafted in South Slope, Brooklyn,...

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Your Guide to Heritage Meats

Your Guide to Heritage Meats

Left two photos by Edsel Little via Creative Commons. Right photo by Jim Richardson. If you’re a fan of the TV show Portlandia, you’ll remember the first episode where Peter and Nance pepper a restaurant server with questions about the chicken they are about to order. The waitress obliges them with the chicken’s photo and curriculum vitae—the fowl’s name is “Colin”—and he was raised, we learn, on a farm just south of Portland. Peter and Nance put a hold on the table and excuse themselves to check...

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The “McRob” McRib: A REAL Barbecued Rib Sandwich

The “McRob” McRib: A REAL Barbecued Rib Sandwich

All photos by Rob Baas. You know our friend and Barbecue Board member Rob Baas. A few weeks ago the Project Smoke fire wrangler, BBQ U alum, and all around master of live fire cooking had the idea to reimagine the fast food McRib as real barbecue. Challenge met and expectations surpassed. This is one guest blog I can’t wait to try out on my smoker. –Steven Like so many other American high school kids who needed gas money, my first job was at the local McDonald's. Had the McRib been on the local menu back then, I might be working there still. If ever there was a fast food item with a cult following, it is the McRib. It doesn't really make any sense,...

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Home-Smoked Pastrami, Part 1

Home-Smoked Pastrami, Part 1

Photo by Richard Dallett. If you think to eat killer pastrami you need to visit a landmark deli in Manhattan, you haven’t been to Fette Sau BBQ in Brooklyn. Or The Granary in San Antonio. Or The Local Pig in Kansas City. America is experiencing a pastrami renaissance with soulfully cured, assertively spiced smoked meat turning up at top barbecue joints across the country. Darkly crusted with crushed coriander seed and fiery with black pepper. Meat so moist it squirts when you cut into it and so flavorful, you...

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In Praise of Pork Shoulder, Part 3: How to Cook It

In Praise of Pork Shoulder, Part 3: How to Cook It

The pork shoulder may be the world’s simplest cut of meat to cook. Simpler than steak. Simpler than brisket. Simpler than ribs. In a nutshell, you season the hell out of it (for tips on buying and seasoning pork shoulder, see Parts 1 and 2 of this series) and cook it at a low to moderate heat for 3 to 6 hours (2-1/2 to 3 hours at 350 degrees; 5 to 6 hours at 250 degrees.) What emerges from your smoker or grill gives you a bodacious blend of crisp crust, luscious fat, and meltingly tender meat. But simple doesn’t mean simple-minded....

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The Feast: Porchetta Goes Whole Hog

The Feast: Porchetta Goes Whole Hog

Every once in a while, you come across an idea so original, so insanely mouthwatering, and just so darn cool, you shelve whatever else is on your grill or smoker to try it. Such is Michael Garcia’s porchetta, a whole hog skillfully boned, stuffed with fennel, garlic, herbs, and other seasonings, tied into a compact cylinder, spit-roasted, and served skin crackling crisp off the fire. Hey, if you do try it (I mean when you try it), send photos to the Barbecue Board. Thanks, Mike. –Steven...

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