Steven Raichlen's Barbecue! Bible

Posts Tagged ‘smoking’

Beef Brisket Made Easy

Beef Brisket Made Easy

Photo by Richard Dallett. Brisket. Few words have such power to make mouths water and stomachs roar with hunger. Brisket is the summum of Texas barbecue and its popularity extends far beyond the Lone Star State. Food writers and pit masters like to mystify the process, making smoking a brisket sound as difficult as quantum physics. Well, I’m going to let you in on a little secret: Brisket is easy, requiring maybe 30 minutes of actual work from start to finish. True, that start to finish can stretch as long as 16 hours. But armed with the right tools (a sharp knife, a remote digital thermometer, and unlined butcher...

Read more →

The Raichlen 4th of July Menu

The Raichlen 4th of July Menu

They get me when the first veterans march by. World War II vets, white-haired but proud, followed by the men and women who served in Korea, Vietnam, the Gulf, and now Afghanistan and Iraq. It’s the Independence Day parade in Edgartown, Martha’s Vineyard, and I can’t seem to keep my eyes dry. I’ve celebrated July 4th in a lot of places (including overseas), but there’s nothing like a small town parade to make you feel proud and American. Independence Day barbecues are a venerable American tradition. When a triumphant George Washington...

Read more →

Reverse Searing: Godsend or Gimmick?

Reverse Searing: Godsend or Gimmick?

When I started smoking meat 25 years ago, no one knew of reverse searing. Today, you can hardly browse barbecue websites without being urged to try it. The process turns the traditional method of cooking a steak or roast—hot sear followed by slow roast—on its head. You start by smoking the meat low and slow to an internal temperature of about 100 degrees, then you char it over a hot fire to raise it to the desired temperature, applying the crisp smoky crust at the...

Read more →

Home-Smoked Pastrami, Part 2

Home-Smoked Pastrami, Part 2

Photo by jeffreyw via Creative Commons. Recently we told you about the fascinating history of pastrami. (Hint—it involves camels, geese, and beef navels.) This time I’m going to reveal the 8 steps to pastrami nirvana, complete with my fail-proof recipe for pastrami you cook like barbecued brisket. The only other thing you need is mustard. The meat: The traditional cut for pastrami is beef navel—a rectangular muscle richly striated with fat from the underbelly of the steer and typically...

Read more →

Home-Smoked Pastrami, Part 1

Home-Smoked Pastrami, Part 1

Photo by Richard Dallett. If you think to eat killer pastrami you need to visit a landmark deli in Manhattan, you haven’t been to Fette Sau BBQ in Brooklyn. Or The Granary in San Antonio. Or The Local Pig in Kansas City. America is experiencing a pastrami renaissance with soulfully cured, assertively spiced smoked meat turning up at top barbecue joints across the country. Darkly crusted with crushed coriander seed and fiery with black pepper. Meat so moist it squirts when you cut into it and so flavorful, you...

Read more →

Lights, Camera, Action: Project Smoke Is Coming to Public Television

Lights, Camera, Action: Project Smoke Is Coming to Public Television

It’s official! I’m going back on Public Television to create a new show—Project Smoke. Our mission: to do for smoking what Primal Grill and Barbecue University did for grilling. We start taping in Tucson, Arizona, next week. The show launches nationwide just in time for July 4th. What makes Project Smoke different? First, our content: this will be the first how-to show on to focus exclusively on smoking. Hot smoking. Cold smoking. Smoke-roasting...

Read more →

Barbecue University

My Home-Built Smokehouse

My Home-Built Smokehouse

It gives me especially great pleasure to introduce this week's guest blogger. His name is Paul Kuconis and he's a recent graduate of Barbecue University™. And I like to think his time at the Broadmoor inspired him to delve deeper into the arts of smoking and grilling. So deep that he built his own smoker. I asked Paul to share his home-made smoker with our barbecue community. Just think what Barbecue University™ could do for your passion. –Steven...

Read more →

A Guide to Charcoal Water Smokers

A Guide to Charcoal Water Smokers

“Stick burners” (offset barrel smokers) may give you the bragging rights, not to mention smoker envy. But if you’re just starting out with smoking, you’d do well to consider a water smoker—sometimes called a bullet smoker. Shaped like an upright bullet (hence the nickname), the water smoker is simple to operate, but serious enough for competition cooks, who often employ these hard-working cookers in multiple units. The water smoker has a small footprint (about the size of a kettle grill)—an...

Read more →

How to Make Bacon from Scratch

How to Make Bacon from Scratch

If you live in Miami’s Little Havana, you may remember a day last summer when you awoke to an aroma decidedly different than the cumin, garlic, and sour orange scents that normally emanate from the lechón asado (roast pork) parlors in this Cuban neighborhood. It was a pork smell, alright, but mingled with the smoke of slow smoldering hickory and apple wood. It was a smell you’d associate with a smokehouse in backwoods Tennessee. Which was no accident, because when James...

Read more →

A Guide to Offset Barrel Smokers

A Guide to Offset Barrel Smokers

Water smokers, box, barrel, and pellet smokers do a fine job smoking meats and seafood. But nothing establishes your street cred as pit master who means business like an offset smoker. For years, these hunka-hunka smokers—a.k.a., offset barrel smokers, horizontal smokers, pipe smokers, or “stick-burners”—have dominated the competition barbecue circuit. Now, thanks to mass-market models available at stores like Home Depot and Lowes, they’re bringing their own particular aura of machismo to American and European backyards. The first offset smokers were likely built by oilfield workers in Texas and Oklahoma. Far from home and restaurants, it didn’t take much for barbecue-starved welders...

Read more →