Steven Raichlen's Barbecue! Bible

Posts Tagged ‘steak’

How to Buy and Cook a Dry-Aged Steak

How to Buy and Cook a Dry-Aged Steak

What to Look for When Buying Dry-Aged Steaks Because dry-aged beef demands time, expertise, and specialized equipment, it can be tough to find. Few supermarkets carry dry-aged steaks or USDA Prime beef, making it near impossible for some Americans to get their hands on dry-aged beef from local retailers. Given the high costs associated with dry-aged beef, most consumers want to be sure that they’re getting the best. At Chicago Steak Company (which...

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Dry-Aged Beef: Worth the Wait

Dry-Aged Beef: Worth the Wait

Like cheese and fine wine, beef becomes better with age. That might seem counter-intuitive. After all, anyone who’s left a T-bone in the fridge a week too long knows that the results are, um, let’s say, less than pleasant. On the other hand, anyone who’s tasted a steakhouse-grade, dry-aged cut of USDA Prime ribeye knows the bold intermingling of savory, umami flavors that comes with skilled dry-aging. The difference can be so stark that for some steak lovers, the idea of eating unaged steak is akin to eating microwaved brisket....

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Steak Gets Stuffed: Stuffed Steaks from Around Planet Barbecue

Steak Gets Stuffed: Stuffed Steaks from Around Planet Barbecue

When it comes to steak, most people argue for simplicity. Buy the best beef you can afford—preferably prime, dry-aged, or grass-fed. Season it liberally with coarse salt and cracked black pepper, and grill over a hot fire (preferably wood) until the outside is just this side of charred and the inside is rare but warm. You’ll let it rest for a few minutes, of course, before digging in. Other grilling cultures around the world see steak differently. They don’t hesitate to stuff it with bold compatible...

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Presenting the Axe-Handle Rib-Eye Steak

Presenting the Axe-Handle Rib-Eye Steak

Photograph by William Hereford. From time to time, we ask some of America’s most respected grill masters to write guest blog posts for BarbecueBible.com. It gives me great pleasure to introduce Joe Carroll, author of Feeding the Fire and founder of Fette Sau and St. Anselm in Brooklyn. When Fette Sau opened in 2007, it launched the barbecue revolution in Brooklyn and its brisket, spareribs, and pastrami remain exemplars of the species. (Carroll...

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Wagyu and Kobe Beef: Cutting Through the Udder Confusion

Wagyu and Kobe Beef: Cutting Through the Udder Confusion

Photo: Snake River Farms Kobe-Style Gold Grade Manhattan Filet. Unless you’ve been in a food coma for many years, you’ve likely heard of Kobe, the ultra-premium beef named after the capital city in Japan’s Hyogo prefecture. Kobe beef is renowned for its outrageous tracery of white intramuscular fat (called shimofuri, or “beautiful snow”), unctuous, buttery texture, and complex umami flavors. When raw, it resembles nothing so much as a red or pink...

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10 Steps to Grilling the Perfect Porterhouse, T-Bone or Any Really Thick Steak

10 Steps to Grilling the Perfect Porterhouse, T-Bone or Any Really Thick Steak

Photo by _BuBBy_ on Flickr via Creative Commons. In our last blog post, we explained the difference between a porterhouse and a T-bone steak. Today we cover the 10 steps to grilling the perfect T-bone or porterhouse—no matter how thick. Use a combo grilling method for a combo steak: If cooking over charcoal (and I hope you are), set up a three-zone fire. Dump a chimney of lit coals into the grill. With a grill hoe or garden hoe, spread the coals into a double layer at the far side and a single layer in the center. Leave the section closest to you coal-free. Replace...

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T-Bones and Porterhouses: What’s the Difference?

T-Bones and Porterhouses: What’s the Difference?

Above photos by Snake River Farms. T-bones and porterhouses are a steak lover’s nirvana—a New York strip and a tenderloin, a.k.a. filet mignon, connected by a gnaw-worthy T-shaped bone. But what’s the difference? a viewer asked after watching a video of me grilling Caveman T-Bones. Are they different names for the same steak? A “tomato-tomahto” thing whereby Texans call it T-bone and Yankees name it porterhouse? I understand the confusion. The steaks can look almost identical. Both...

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How to Choose the Best Ribeye (Cowboy) Steaks

How to Choose the Best Ribeye (Cowboy) Steaks

From our friends at Strauss Brands who brought us What Is Grass-Fed Beef and What’s So Great About It? and provided the beef for Project Smoke come two helpful videos on steak: Butchery 101: From 107 Rib to Cowboy Steak Americans love a great steak, and the ribeye is our king cut. Resident grass-fed beef experts Mark Goessl and Lori Dunn explain the fabrication of the beef rib primal cut into bone-in ribeye steaks or cowboy steaks. These...

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Reverse Searing: Godsend or Gimmick?

Reverse Searing: Godsend or Gimmick?

When I started smoking meat 25 years ago, no one knew of reverse searing. Today, you can hardly browse barbecue websites without being urged to try it. The process turns the traditional method of cooking a steak or roast—hot sear followed by slow roast—on its head. You start by smoking the meat low and slow to an internal temperature of about 100 degrees, then you char it over a hot fire to raise it to the desired temperature, applying the crisp smoky crust at the...

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Extreme Grilling: Steak Six Ways

Extreme Grilling: Steak Six Ways

Photo by Forres Meadows. You’re a confident griller of steaks. You’ve mastered New York strips, you can handle flank steak, and on several occasions, have produced magazine centerfold-worthy porterhouses. Now it’s time to tackle extreme steak grilling: That means on a shovel, grilled over spruce branches, wrapped in hay, in a salt and cloth crust, on a pitchfork, and my favorite—grilled directly on the embers. For obvious reasons, we’re going to have to leave out steaks grilled over a trough of molten...

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