Steven Raichlen's Barbecue! Bible

Posts Tagged ‘steak’

The New Cuts of Steak: Big Flavor, Merciful Price, Part 2

The New Cuts of Steak: Big Flavor, Merciful Price, Part 2

"Carne asada" by Flickr user Daniel R. Blume via Creative Commons. For more than two decades, the slogan of the beef industry was, “Beef. It’s what’s for dinner.” Except that in some American households, it wasn’t. And it it’s not hard to guess one cause of the downward drift in consumption: According to the USDA, the average price of a pound of beef nearly doubled between 2002 and 2015 ($3.32 versus $6.29). One industry spokesperson dubbed hamburger “the new steak” and steak “the new Maserati.” Enter the Beef Checkoff program,...

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Butchery Basics: Know Where Your Steak Comes From

Butchery Basics: Know Where Your Steak Comes From

From our friends at Strauss Brands who provided the tasty beef for Project Smoke and masterfully answered What Is Grass-Fed Beef and What’s So Great About It? comes a helpful video on breaking down cuts of beef: https://youtu.be/3wC_4DR_A74 Porterhouse. And T-bone. Two of the most revered cuts among steak fanatics everywhere. Check out this video from Mark Goessl and Lori Dunn of Strauss Brands to learn the difference and how to cut...

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The New Cuts of Steak: Big Flavor, Merciful Price

The New Cuts of Steak: Big Flavor, Merciful Price

Photo by Rob Baas. "The only time to eat diet food is while you’re waiting for the steak to cook."       —Julia Child Flat iron? Calotte? Teres major? Meet the new steaks, and don’t feel badly if you haven’t heard of them. A few years ago, the Beef Checkoff program teamed up with meat scientists from the University of Florida and the University of Nebraska to identify value cuts for consumers while minimizing “trim”—the bits that are ground into hamburger. They focused most of their efforts on the chuck...

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Eat Steak Like a Brazilian: Picanha, Part 1

Eat Steak Like a Brazilian: Picanha, Part 1

While the world’s eyes are trained on the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, I thought I’d acquaint you with one of Brazil’s most delectable grilled meats: picanha. Pronounced “pee-KHA-nyah” in Portuguese, this tender cut of beef is indisputably a carnivorous heaven on earth. Picanha (not “piranha,” Spellcheck, despite the Brazilian connection) is beef top sirloin with a thick cap of fat. It is sometimes called rump, rump cover, or coulotte. Not surprisingly,...

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In Defense of Poblano Peppers: Floyd Cardoz’s Flavorwalla

In Defense of Poblano Peppers: Floyd Cardoz’s Flavorwalla

Photograph copyright © 2016 by Lauren Volo. From time to time we run guest blog posts from my fellow authors at Workman Publishing. If you love skirt steak as much as I do, you’ll go crazy for this fire-seared beef with poblano chiles and horseradish from Indian-born chef Floyd Cardoz’s fantastic new book Flavorwalla. –Steven Mexican food is a lot like Indian food: generally easy to prepare and based on very appealing flavors. Mexican cooking also...

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How to Buy and Cook a Dry-Aged Steak

How to Buy and Cook a Dry-Aged Steak

What to Look for When Buying Dry-Aged Steaks Because dry-aged beef demands time, expertise, and specialized equipment, it can be tough to find. Few supermarkets carry dry-aged steaks or USDA Prime beef, making it near impossible for some Americans to get their hands on dry-aged beef from local retailers. Given the high costs associated with dry-aged beef, most consumers want to be sure that they’re getting the best. At Chicago Steak Company (which...

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Dry-Aged Beef: Worth the Wait

Dry-Aged Beef: Worth the Wait

Like cheese and fine wine, beef becomes better with age. That might seem counter-intuitive. After all, anyone who’s left a T-bone in the fridge a week too long knows that the results are, um, let’s say, less than pleasant. On the other hand, anyone who’s tasted a steakhouse-grade, dry-aged cut of USDA Prime ribeye knows the bold intermingling of savory, umami flavors that comes with skilled dry-aging. The difference can be so stark that for some steak lovers, the idea of eating unaged steak is akin to eating microwaved brisket....

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Steak Gets Stuffed: Stuffed Steaks from Around Planet Barbecue

Steak Gets Stuffed: Stuffed Steaks from Around Planet Barbecue

When it comes to steak, most people argue for simplicity. Buy the best beef you can afford—preferably prime, dry-aged, or grass-fed. Season it liberally with coarse salt and cracked black pepper, and grill over a hot fire (preferably wood) until the outside is just this side of charred and the inside is rare but warm. You’ll let it rest for a few minutes, of course, before digging in. Other grilling cultures around the world see steak differently. They don’t hesitate to stuff it with bold compatible...

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Presenting the Axe-Handle Rib-Eye Steak

Presenting the Axe-Handle Rib-Eye Steak

Photograph by William Hereford. From time to time, we ask some of America’s most respected grill masters to write guest blog posts for BarbecueBible.com. It gives me great pleasure to introduce Joe Carroll, author of Feeding the Fire and founder of Fette Sau and St. Anselm in Brooklyn. When Fette Sau opened in 2007, it launched the barbecue revolution in Brooklyn and its brisket, spareribs, and pastrami remain exemplars of the species. (Carroll...

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Wagyu and Kobe Beef: Cutting Through the Udder Confusion

Wagyu and Kobe Beef: Cutting Through the Udder Confusion

Photo: Snake River Farms Kobe-Style Gold Grade Manhattan Filet. Unless you’ve been in a food coma for many years, you’ve likely heard of Kobe, the ultra-premium beef named after the capital city in Japan’s Hyogo prefecture. Kobe beef is renowned for its outrageous tracery of white intramuscular fat (called shimofuri, or “beautiful snow”), unctuous, buttery texture, and complex umami flavors. When raw, it resembles nothing so much as a red or pink...

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