Steven Raichlen's Barbecue! Bible

Posts Tagged ‘brisket’

Eat Your Words

Two “Must Have” Books for Your Barbecue Library

Two “Must Have” Books for Your Barbecue Library

Pitmaster: Recipes, Techniques & Barbecue Wisdom (Voyageur Press, 2017) Most winning competition-level pitmasters keep their cards close to their vests, seldom revealing the secret strategies that consistently propel them to center stage (a “walk”) once the scoring’s complete. Not these guys. They seem determined to spill the beans (barbecued, of course). I first met the co-authors of Pitmaster, restaurateurs Andy Husbands and Chris Hall, in 2010 when they...

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Hot Stuff

An Austin Barbecue Crawl

An Austin Barbecue Crawl

From time to time we offer guest blogs on Barbecuebible.com and this one comes especially close to home.   It was written by my cousin, Larry Hoffman.   A musician and composer, Larry goes to Austin once a year for the Eastern Kings Blues Festival, and he always checks in with “Cousin Steven” to ask where he should eat.   Over the years, he’s established his barbecue bona fides, so I asked him to write a blog on his discoveries this year.   If you’re interested in learning more about his music, check out his website:...

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Under the Hood

Kalamazoo Cabinet Smoker and Russ Faulk, the Man Who Created It

Kalamazoo Cabinet Smoker and Russ Faulk, the Man Who Created It

Most grill and smoker designs have been around for decades, even centuries. It’s not often that a manufacturer comes along with something radically new. Well, Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet has, and I got to test drive it during the taping of Project Smoke, Season 3. (We used it to smoke pastrami bacon and Korean pulled pork shoulder.) It’s the Kalamazoo Cabinet Smoker and it’s simply one of the most intriguing fusions of high design, ingenious engineering, and primal smoke and fire on Planet Barbecue. You’ve probably heard of Kalamazoo—the manufacturer of super premium grills that perform like Ferraris—and are priced like Ferraris, too. Kalamazoo’s first grill—the...

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Under the Hood

How to Buy A Smoker, Part 2

How to Buy A Smoker, Part 2

If you own a charcoal grill with a tight-fitting lid, you already have a smoker. Simply set it up for indirect grilling, add wood chips or chunks to the coals, and you’re in business. (If you own a gas grill, you can add subtle smoke flavor to your food by using a smoking pouch or smoking box, but the grill’s rear vents will allow most of the smoke to escape.) There are some drawbacks, however. Because kettle grills are designed for grilling, it’s difficult to maintain an even heat at lower temperatures....

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Planet Barbecue

The Matter of Meat: Responsibly Raised Steak and Brisket

The Matter of Meat: Responsibly Raised Steak and Brisket

This post is brought to you by Nebraska Star Beef, which provided advertising support. As Steven has said time and time again, where your food comes from and how it was raised matters as much as how you grill it. Nebraska Star Beef shares this belief, and has tailored their business to follow this tenet. With a focus on traditional methods of raising, aging, and butchering cattle, the result is a high quality meat with a trustworthy...

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Under the Hood

Make Shun Cutlery Part of Your BBQ Arsenal

Make Shun Cutlery Part of Your BBQ Arsenal

This post is brought to you by Shun Cutlery, which provided advertising support. If you’ve ever prepared our Slam Dunk Brisket, you know what it really takes to prepare this relatively simple recipe: the right tools and the patience to wait during a long, slow cooking period over low heat. With hours invested in preparation, the serving process is likely to be the last thing on your mind. But we urge you to prepare for the carving stage—next...

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Barbecue University™

Tips from BUSH’s BBQ Bootcamp

Tips from BUSH’s BBQ Bootcamp

It’s everyone’s favorite time of year: the time when we shed our scarves, break out the patio furniture, and gear up for some glorious summer grilling. If you’ve been avoiding your grill since the first signs of winter, or simply need a brush-up on your technique, below are a few of my favorite grilling tips to help you kick off the season the right way. (Below is Part 1 of 2, for Part 2 click here.) 1. Control the fire, don’t let it control you ...

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Revealed: Our 12 Most Popular Recipes

Revealed: Our 12 Most Popular Recipes

Left two photos by Richard Dallett. Right two photos by Ben Fink from The Barbecue! Bible (Workman). The headline says it all: the 12 all time most popular recipes on BarbecueBible.com. Here they are in all their smoky glory. It’s clear that this barbecue community likes meat, meat, and more meat! Especially brisket, ribs, and—no surprise—bacon. One vegetable made this list—the onion bomb—and even it has plenty of beefy, bacon-y goodness. What can I say, folks, but “Grill on!” And be sure to post photos of YOUR masterpieces on the Barbecue Board, my Facebook page, Twitter, and...

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How to Make the Perfect Pot of Chili—Start with Barbecued Meat

How to Make the Perfect Pot of Chili—Start with Barbecued Meat

Sometimes the best comfort foods come ladled from a pot—especially during the freeze of February. Speaking of pots, everyone should know how to cook up a pot of chili. Fierce controversies surround what constitutes the perfect bowl o’ red. Texans prefer all-beef chili—ideally, with meat cubed rather than ground—and points are deducted for adding beans and other fillers. In New Mexico it’s the chile peppers that matter and some versions don’t even...

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Beef Brisket Made Easy

Beef Brisket Made Easy

Photo by Richard Dallett. Brisket. Few words have such power to make mouths water and stomachs roar with hunger. Brisket is the summum of Texas barbecue and its popularity extends far beyond the Lone Star State. Food writers and pit masters like to mystify the process, making smoking a brisket sound as difficult as quantum physics. Well, I’m going to let you in on a little secret: Brisket is easy, requiring maybe 30 minutes of actual work from start to finish. True, that start to finish can stretch as long as 16 hours. But armed with the right tools (a sharp knife, a remote digital thermometer, and unlined butcher...

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