Steven Raichlen's Barbecue! Bible

Posts Tagged ‘grilling tips’

Barbecue University™

How to Cold Smoke Cheese at Home

How to Cold Smoke Cheese at Home

If you’re looking for an easy project to expand your grilling and smoking repertoire, there’s nothing more gratifying than cold smoking cheese. It’s easy, requires very little in the way of equipment, is relatively inexpensive, and is a fantastic addition your pantry. (Not to mention, it makes a great gift.) Wintertime is the perfect time to try your hand at cold-smoking; you should have no trouble maintaining temperatures below 90 degrees in your smoker or grill, especially if you live in a northern state. If you’re...

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Barbecue University™

13 Tips for Winter Grilling

13 Tips for Winter Grilling

It wasn’t so long ago that people routinely retired their grills after Labor Day, stowing them in a corner of the garage or basement to commiserate with the golf clubs until better weather. My, how times have changed. Whether it’s due to larger investments in grills and outdoor kitchens, a protracted appetite for the smoky flavors of summer, or the continued need for barbecue bragging rights, live fire cooking outdoors has become a four season...

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Under the Hood

Temperature Control Necessities for your Backyard

Temperature Control Necessities for your Backyard

Steven Raichlen with Pitmaster BBQ Bob Trudnak of BBQ Guru This post is brought to you by BBQ Guru, which provided advertising support. When setting out to smoke your first brisket, you contemplated the same question all BBQers have faced: “225 degrees for 10 hours in the smoker?? How am I going to stay sane and still monitor the cooking temp all day??” Consider too a large pork shoulder you need to pull off the grill...

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Hot Stuff

Steak and Potatoes: Florentine Steak and Garlic Fingerlings

Steak and Potatoes: Florentine Steak and Garlic Fingerlings

Several weeks ago, we posted the first installment in our new series, “Steak and Potatoes.” We thought now was an appropriate time to post another as everyone is weary of Thanksgiving leftovers and hungry for a good piece of steak! Tuscany’s cuisine is primarily based on the concept of “cucina povera,” which translates to “poor kitchen.” Pasta, beans, local vegetables, and olive oil are the primary building blocks of Tuscan cuisine. Which is why it’s ironic that one...

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Barbecue University™

7 Steps to Grilling Nirvana

7 Steps to Grilling Nirvana

Grilling is the world’s oldest and most universal cooking method, practiced in virtually every country and culture on six continents (seven if you consider the cookouts staged by grill-obsessed scientists in Antarctica). Today’s grillers face a staggering number of decisions, from which grill and accessories to buy, to selecting the best fuel and cooking method. (There are actually five different grilling methods, each with its own unique cooking properties. And that’s before you get to specialized grilling techniques, such as plancha grilling and planking.) Of course, you need to know...

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Barbecue University™

Winning Baby Backs for Your Backyard Bash

Winning Baby Backs for Your Backyard Bash

If ribs epitomize barbecue for most Americans, the baby back epitomizes ribs. Cut from high on the hog, just next to the spine, baby backs have tender meat—more so than spareribs—abundant fat, and a convenient shape and size that makes one rack perfect for feeding two people if side dishes are served. (A rack contains 8 ribs at a minimum and 13 at a maximum.) You’ve heard the phrase “fall-off-the-bone tender.” Never, in my opinion, have five words done more harm to the notion of what constitutes good eating. Show me ribs...

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Hot Stuff

How to Smoke a Whole Pig

How to Smoke a Whole Pig

A whole pig is the apex of barbecue. As you climb the ladder of smoking enlightenment, at some point you’ll want to try one. There are too many variables (hog size, smoker design, weather, wood, and so on) to cover in a single recipe, but here are the basic guidelines. The pig: Hogs range in size from 20-pound suckling pigs to 225-pound behemoths. The first time you smoke a hog, I recommend a 50-pounder (that’s gutted weight, by the way, but with the head on). It’s small enough...

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Barbecue University™

Grill the Perfect Steak Time After Time

Grill the Perfect Steak Time After Time

When Americans are polled about their favorite foods for grilling, steak always heads the list. A slab of beef is the perfect food for the grill: Its broad surface area soaks up wood and smoke flavors, and it cooks quickly. The most common mistake made in grilling steak is overcooking it; the second most common is undercooking. And in my experience, most grill masters fear both. Because, let’s face it: A great steak can set you back more than a few bucks. If you’re insecure when grilling a pricey steak, you’re...

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Barbecue University™

Sweet Corn Steps Up to the Plate

Sweet Corn Steps Up to the Plate

A company well-known for canned and frozen vegetables recently announced America’s favorite vegetable is . . . drum roll, please . . . broccoli. Sorry, but I’m not buying it. And not just because they only polled 4,000 people. What I am buying is sweet corn—from roadside stands, the farmers’ market, and when they’re selling fresh local ears, even the supermarket. Just-picked sweet corn is in season in many states right now, making it one of the best things about August and the dog days of summer. Corn has its...

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Barbecue University™

The Cold Grate Method for Grilling Steaks

The Cold Grate Method for Grilling Steaks

If your idea of a perfect steak is crusty on the outside, grilled to a uniform rare to medium-rare, masterfully seasoned with a hint of wood smoke, and tantalizingly juicy when you cut into it, listen up. There’s a new grilling method you’ve probably never heard of. The secret? A cold grate. I was first introduced to this singular technique by David Parrish, the founder of Adrenaline Barbecue Company (aka, ABC) of Concord, North Carolina. David,...

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