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Grill to Table: Clams Steinhatchee Recipe

Clams Steinhatchee Recipe

In my recent blog “From the Stove to the Grill: The Ultimate Steak and Egg Breakfast Sandwich,” I introduced Planet Barbecue to Made In’s carbon steel cookware. I showcased their carbon steel griddle and made an over-the-top breakfast sandwich. The carbon steel line of products includes griddles, fry pans, grill fry pans, paella pans, roasting pan, and woks. Made In is also known for their stainless steel cookware, knives, and bakeware.

Today, I’m going to share how I used the Made In 10-inch carbon steel fry pan to make “Clams Steinhatchee.” The first season I was the fire wrangler on Project Fire, it was being filmed in Steinhatchee, FL. I watched Steven Raichlen prepare this dish with fresh clams harvested near the set. I have been making it since then. It can be served as an appetizer or a meal.

I received a 10- and 12-inch carbon steel frying pans from Made In. The fry pans from Made In are durable thanks to the carbon steel construction. The carbon steel fry pan has the heat retention capability of cast-iron, but the control and maneuverability of Stainless Clad. It is naturally non-stick. The carbon steel can withstand temperatures up to 1200 degrees. The carbon steel also allows you to control and adjust the temperature easily, which is not the case with cast-iron.

Clams Steinhatchee Recipe

Here is how the Clams Steinhatchee came together. I started by lighting a chimney starter full of lump charcoal. While the charcoal heated up, I cut five slices of bacon in to slivers, thinly sliced six scallions, one tablespoon of chopped dill, and measured out a half cup of white wine. I also washed the clams. (Discard any that fail to close when tapped.)

Clams Steinhatchee Recipe

The charcoal was ready in fifteen minutes. I spread out the charcoal to create a two-zone fire. The two zones gave me a safety zone in case the fire got too hot. I added two wood chunks to impart a smoky aroma to the clams and the broth.

Next, I placed the carbon steel fry pan on the grill over the fire and added the slivered bacon and two tablespoons of butter. Once the bacon started to brown and crisp, I added the scallions and dill and sauteed them for 30 seconds. I added the white wine. Once it started to boil, the clams were added.

Clams Steinhatchee Recipe

I then moved the pan to the safe zone and placed the cover on the grill. I wanted the clams and the broth to capture the wood smoke. Here are two interesting observations I made while cooking. The handle did not get blazing hot when I moved it around on the grill, but don’t grab it without a grill glove. The clam broth was boiling while over direct heat but came down to a simmer when I moved it to the safe zone. I like the temperature control of the carbon steel, that you would not get with cast-iron.

Once the clams opened, they were done. No thermometer required. Prior to cooking the clams, I grilled a few bread fingers to dunk into the clam broth.

Bread Sticks

The Results

I garnished with more dill, and it was time to eat. The clams were served family-style. The clams were tender and smoky. The broth was light and briny from the clams, and smoky from the bacon and the wood chunks. The bacon added a salty and smoky flavor to the broth. The scallions and dill provided freshness to the broth. The crusty bread fingers were perfect for soaking up the delicious clam broth.

The carbon steel fry pan from Made In held up over the grill. I was surprised the handle did not get too hot and that the temperature of the pan came down just by moving it to the safe zone. That does not happen when I use a cast-iron pan over a live fire. I’m looking forward cooking with the carbon steel fry pan on the grill again and on the stove.

Clams Steinhatchee Recipe

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