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Argentina: World’s Champion Beef Eaters

Argentina: World’s Champion Beef Eaters

This year we’re introducing a mouth-watering new series on the blog: smoke-and-fire hotspots all around the world, as featured in my cookbook Planet Barbecue! Today we’ll focus on Argentina, arguably the biggest steak culture in the world. Next up will be Singapore, just in time for the Lunar New Year.

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The stats are in and the winner is … Argentina. No other country consumes more beef. Last year, Argentineans consumed an average of 154 pounds per person—compared to 89.8 pounds in the U.S.

Argentina’s love affair (I use the term deliberately) with beef began with the gauchos, rugged cowboys who settled the Pampas to tend vast herds of cattle, the descendants of steers brought here by conquistadors in 1536. Gaucho life was primitive, and so was gaucho barbecue: whole lambs, pigs, and racks of beef ribs stuck on T-shaped metal stakes in front of a roaring bonfire. Seasonings were limited to salt or perhaps such dried herbs as you could find at a country general store. And the herbs were moistened with a little vinegar—the origin of Argentina’s table sauce, chimichurri. The gaucho’s asado (literally, “roast”) remains one of the world’s most authentic and heroic live-fire cooking experiences, popular throughout rural Argentina and even in major cities.

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By the early twentieth century, beef had made Buenos Aires one of the wealthiest cities in the western hemisphere. Refrigerated freighters, their holds brimming with meat, steamed down the Plata River destined for New York, Europe, and beyond. Beef fortunes transformed Buenos Aires from a cultural backwater into the “Paris of South America.”

Over time, the rustic asado of the gauchos evolved into sophisticated steak houses distinguished by their broad menus, with dishes grilled to order on industrial-strength parrillas (grills). The preparation remains simple—salt, fire, and perhaps a chimichurri for serving. The focus stays on the beef.

Recipes from Argentina:
Buenos Aires “Heart-Stopper”
The Real Chimichurri
Roasted Bell Pepper Salad with Anchovies and Garlic

Adapted from Planet Barbecue! by Steven Raichlen (Workman Publishing).

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Join the Discussion

  • Genaunehmer

    Interesting article! I wonder if consumption of huge amounts of burned beef (the classic grilled red meat) leads to increased cancer rates in Argentina. If so, what types of cancer could those be? In Germany, there are constant warnings of increased cancer risks from eating meat in general and from eating grilled foods in particular. You know the discussion… I could not find a correlation between particular diseases and eating grilled foods. Anyone any idea?